Talk:Franz Sigel

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Major disagreement with the "Battle of Carthage" article[edit]

This article states, "At the start of the war, Sigel recruited and organized an expedition to southwest Missouri and fought the Battle of Carthage, defeating 8,000 Confederates with only 800 of his own men."

The Battle of Carthage article states, "The experienced Col. Franz Sigel commanded 1,100 well trained soldiers fighting for the United States. The Missouri State Guard was commanded by Governor Claiborne F. Jackson who commanded over 4,000 unorganized, inexperienced soldiers, along with 2,000 unarmed troops who did not participate in the battle. It was a major victory for the Missouri State Guard, who fought under the Confederate flag, and played a huge part in determining Missouri's course during the war."

That's a major disagreement in the two articles. 207.69.137.202 05:47, 14 January 2007 (UTC)

Sigel indeed in many opinions was the clear loser at Carthage, no the winner. The term "major victory" however should be challenged in the Carthage article, as it was a win, yes, but not major or decisive. The pro-secessionists built up the battle to epic proportions for recruiting purposes, but I would classify it as simply a victory, not a major victory. Scott Mingus 14:02, 14 January 2007 (UTC)
I have reworded both articles. Scott Mingus 14:14, 14 January 2007 (UTC)

I would contest the characterization of the engagement as, "relatively meaningless." The battle forced Sigel's force into retreat, allowing the State Guard time to organize before Wilson's Creek where the State Guard and Confederate detachments decisively defeated Lyon's army. Perhaps the "relatively meaningless" bit can be edited out? Auror 6 February 2007

Harper's Weekly Cartoon[edit]

I came across an editorial cartoon by Thomas Nast in Harper's weekly that seems like it might be useful for this article. It would be relevant for a discussion of Sigel's postbellum role in New York politics and more importantly as a leader in the German American immigrant community. Here is the link: [1] 128.255.85.115 (talk) 18:59, 3 January 2009 (UTC)