Talk:French-based creole languages

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Detroit Creole - Delete?[edit]

Detroit Creole seems to be someone's pet project, started last year. If that is the case, the article should be deleted. In any case, since it is an artificial language, it should not be called "creole", and it should not be listed on this page. Jorge Stolfi 01:24, 26 January 2006 (UTC)

Ilois[edit]

The article Ilois says "Ilois is ... a group of Creole-speaking people, mostly of Indian descent (along with populations from Madagascar, Mauritius, and Mozambique)" with Creole linked to this atricle. But there is no mention about such a creole. What to do? Koryakov Yuri 19:50, 2 April 2006 (UTC)

"The Prairies"?[edit]

The Wikipedia article referred to starts with "Prairies are considered part of the temperate grasslands, savannas, and shrublands biome by ecologists" -- so this usage is not particularly helpful. I don't know what is meant by saying "Descendants of the non-creole colonial koiné are still spoken in Canada (mostly in Québec), the Prairies . . ."

Bourbonnais creoles[edit]

Firstly, Reunionnais Creole is a creole but has also been classified as 'semi-creole' due to the stronger influence of French and decreolisation. Secondly, Rodriguan is a dialect of Mauritian Creole and so is Agalega, there are slight differences but I feel they are similar and should be dialects (Don't know much about Agelega but I wouldn't say it was too different like Seselwa)Domsta333 (talk) 08:59, 12 November 2009 (UTC)

  • Linguists need to give it a rest rest with all these unnecessary titles Reunionais Creole is still creole, regardless if its close to standard french it's still creole. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 74.104.98.219 (talk) 01:27, 8 May 2010 (UTC)

Petit-Nègre?[edit]

La peur de parler "petit-nègre". Komitsuki (talk) 09:40, 8 March 2011 (UTC)

"Descendants of the non-creole colonial koiné are still spoken"[edit]

Wouldn't all French varieties, including those found in Europe, be descended from 17th century French? The only reason the American varieties have been identified with the French of this time period is because this is when American French became isolated from Hexagonal French, and so retains features from this period that the European varieties have lost. However, it is equally true that Hexagonal French preserves features that American varieties have lost. saɪm duʃan Talk|Contribs 05:47, 8 May 2011 (UTC)