Talk:Fuel filter

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Untitled[edit]

hi i am a mechanical student.I know that i should not put this point in discussion but i am doing it because i am having some doubt in this subject I want to know the exact position of the fuel filter is it placad in the carburettor or where it's placed it's being placed in the delivery side or in the suction side please help me out.

It varies with the engine/car. TomGreen 21:57, 18 October 2007 (UTC) —Preceding unsigned comment added by TomGreen (talkcontribs)

In most cases the fuel filter is not mounted in the engine as stated. It is mounted in the fuel supply line. Arydberg (talk) 02:23, 18 June 2013 (UTC)


Also, because diesel engines require large amounts of compression to operate, water in the fuel system can be very dangerous as water cannot be compressed and may cause considerable engine damage.

this implies diesel can be compressed, is that right? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 82.38.193.34 (talk) 14:46, 22 May 2008 (UTC)

Tagged as dubious[edit]

I tagged "water in the fuel system can be very dangerous as water cannot be compressed". It's true water cannot be compressed; neither can diesel fuel. Diesel vapor and water vapor, however, can be compressed. I believe the issue with water is not that it cannot be compressed but it's the lack of lubrication and the risk of rust. There should be some sources out there that address it specifically. Squidfryerchef (talk) 04:48, 8 November 2008 (UTC)

Yes, both water and diesel fuel are incompressible, and it is also largely irrelevent, as even several fuel-charges worth of water would not be enough to hydrolock the cylinder. I have removed the offending sentance. StealthFox 00:04, 3 December 2008 (UTC)
Thanks. Squidfryerchef (talk) 14:23, 4 December 2008 (UTC)

Just to clear the above. The reason water should not enter a diesel engine is two fold: 1) When water enters the cylinder and the cylinder ingnites, the water expands as it turns to steam. These forces are so great that if a single drop of water were to enter a cylinder the subsequent "Explosion" would damage the inctor by blowing the tip off. 2) Water is an extremely hostile fluid. It is much 'harder' than diesel and as it passes through the jet of the injector it causes rapid wear which results in failure [eventually]. Additionally, modern injectors have on board electronics which control the rate and speed of the injection of fuel. Water + electronics? Not good. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Laurencelockwood (talkcontribs) 13:49, 28 July 2010 (UTC)


Poor editing, ambiguities[edit]

The paragraph starting with: "Some filter elements repel water (physically? anti hydroscopic??)" needs to be cleaned up. This is not proper style for Wikipedia. The sentence starting with "I believe" is inappropriate...this is supposed to be an encyclopedic resource, not a blog.