Talk:Futon

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Assertion[edit]

I don't understand this assertion in the article: Futons must be aired in sunlight regularly, especially if not put away during the day.

It would seem more likely that a futon stuffed away in a dark closet during the day would be the futon that needs more airing and sunlight. No?

I've heard that statement made before; I would attempt to justify it by pointing out that futons not stashed away daily tend to develop moldy-type substances on the underside (not so much if you're on tatami though) and washitsu closets tend to be quite dry and airy so they might actually have some benefit over just leaving it on the floor all the time.
I don't think it's implying that a dark closet is better than a bright room, just that when airing/cleaning the futon it's best to expose it to sunlight for a few hours as well.   freshgavin TALK    17:17, 18 December 2005 (UTC)

More information[edit]

I worked at a furniture store that actually sold futons, and I can tell you..the western futon part is missing some critical information. There are 4 sizes of mattresses. 4cm, 6cm, 8cm, and 10cm. The 4, and 6cm models are usually purchased at general stores (WalMart, ShopKo, Kmart, etc). The 8, and 10cm models are purchased at furniture stores, and are generally more expensive.

There are 3 models, a wood, log, and a metal. Metal models are both stronger, and cheaper. Which is good for college students, and dorms. Wood models are used for apartments, and homes because they look better than metal, and are more comfortable, but are more expensive. Log models, are more for cabins, or rustic themed homes. They are the most expensive model out on the market.

also, the price of the frame depends on 3 things. Quality, durability, and paint. Quality is the construction of the bed, durability is the thickness of the tubing, and springs, and paint is the coat, and quality of the paint.

The mattress is also easier to care for. Just air clean, or wipe with a lint stick. These are by far the most advanced futons on the market today!

Also, you can now get a memory-foam futon mattress in some places, though they are very expensive, they are the most comfortable. Also, you can get custom sized mattress thicknesses too. I also will list the main cover colors, and we could use some information on where, and when it was made.

I did more research, and the futon was made around the Japanese period. The Japenese people used them for beding, and worship. Whopper Talk to me Is this guy serious?

RE:Whopper[edit]

Your information is correct, but they did not use it for worship. J-A-V-A 15:21, 30 July 2006 (UTC)

Nor were they made "around the Japanese period". Japan is a geographical location, not a period. 2.25.130.66 (talk) 22:38, 27 September 2011 (UTC)

Not intended for use as a couch[edit]

There was an odd claim that Western-style futons are not intended for use as couches, only as beds or chairs--contradicted by the illustration of a Western futon accompanying the article, and by checking the sites of Western futon retailers. If I was misunderstanding something about this claim, perhaps it needed to be clarified. Bassington 00:37, 25 April 2007 (UTC)

Sofabed[edit]

Why does 'sofabed' redirect here? A bed which can be folded into the body of a couch is much different from a futon! 204.15.100.52 14:25, 28 August 2007 (UTC)

Different Western Styl[edit]

At least in Germany a Futon ins‘t a Sofabed but a Bed wich isn‘t as high as a normal Bed. Opposite Problem in the german Wikipedia were they describe the foresaid low Bed as a "western Futon" --84.46.79.34 (talk) 03:57, 31 March 2011 (UTC)

Western or American Futons[edit]

There is a wealth of documentary evidence supporting the assertion the this style of futon was created and first introduced into the U.S. market by Tara Eden Pearl and distributed sucessfully by her firms: Natural Design, Inc. and Euro 2000. Moreover, she was described frequently in several legitimate sources as the founder of that industry in the U.S. I would assert that the Chicago Tribune is an unimpeachable source as are the others I have located:

^ "Finding the American Dream on a Japanese Bed," by Edie Cohen, Chicago Tribune, June 2, 1986, Business, pg. 17.

^ "86 People to Watch in 1986," by Margaret Carroll, Edie Cohen and Sharon Stangenes, Chicago Tribune, January 2, 1986, Style, Pg. 7.

^ "Fun Furniture: The Flexible Futon," Real Estate Profile, February 5, 1988, pg. 31.

^ "Turnabout is Fair Play," by Jaime Gilson, Chicago Magazine, October 1986

^ "Sweet Dreams" (Cover Story) by Frances Huffman and Barbara Revsine, Entrepreneurial Woman, March 1991, pg. 52 - 55.ear

^ "Furniture that Unfolds with Flair" by Abigail Foerstner, Chicago Tribune, March 1, 1987, pg. 4

^ "Eurostyle--the idea may be Continental but the execution's purely American" (Cover Story, Home Section), Chicago Tribune, August 2, 1987, pg. 1

^ "Jazz", Interiors Magazine, May 1988, pg. 268

^ "Style Preview", Metropolitan Home Magazine, November 1988, pg. 41

^ Two on 2: Interview with the Inventor of Futons, interviewed by Sally Cusick, WBBM-TV Channel 2 Chicago, original air date April 20, 1988

Although much of this material is pre-Internet, articles from the Chicago Tribune can be easily located online. I have not editorialized the information, only summarized it.

The editors of this article specifically requested more citations and documentary evidence; I have supplied same. Moreover, there is nothing remotely promotional in the text I added to the article, neither Ms. Pearl nor Natural Design, Inc. are still in that business and I have only restated that which has appeared in print within the sources cited above.

Why your editors persist in removing legitimate entries, seemingly without researching their validity appears mysterious and not in keeping with the goals of making Wikipedia a reliable secondary source--if I could better understand the rationale behind this process, it would be easier for me to improve my future contributions.Staceydfla (talk) 15:26, 24 October 2012 (UTC)