Talk:G. Evelyn Hutchinson

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Fair use rationale for Image:GEvelynHutchinson.jpg[edit]

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Title[edit]

Why 'G.' instead of 'George'? 128.243.253.101 (talk) 18:58, 17 May 2011 (UTC)

Research Source[edit]

Hi this is a bibliography of the sources I am using to research and eventually add more to this page:

Edmondson, W.T. “G. Evelyn Hutchinson 1903-1991.” Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America, Vol. 72, No. 4 (1991):212-216. Accessed February 24. 2014. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20167300

Hutchinson, G. Evelyn. An introduction to population ecology. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1978.

Hutchinson, G. Evelyn, and Yvette H. Edmondson. A treatise on limnology. New York: Wiley, 1957.

Hutchinson, G. Evelyn, David K. Skelly, David M. Post, Melinda D. Smith, and Thomas E. Lovejoy. The art of ecology: writings of G. Evelyn Hutchinson. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2010.

Lovejoy, Thomas E. “George Evelyn Hutchinson: 13 January 1903 — 17 May 1991” Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society, Vol. 57, (2011): 167-177. Accessed February 24, 2014. http://www.jstor.org/stable/41412876

Patrick, Ruth. “George Evelyn Hutchinson (30 January 1903-17 May 1991).” Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society Vol. 138, No. 4 (December 1994): 530-535.

Slack, Nancy G., G. Evelyn Hutchinson and the Invention of Modern Ecology. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011.

Slobodkin, L.B. “An Appreciation: George Evelyn Hutchinson.” Journal of Animal Ecology Vol. 62, no2 (1993): 390-394. Accessed February 24, 2014. http://www.jstor.org/stable/5370

Slobodkin, Lawrence B., and Nancy G. Slack. 1999. "George Evelyn Hutchinson: 20th-century ecologist". Endeavour. 23: 24-30. MackenzieGlaze (talk) 05:31, 25 February 2014 (UTC)

Possible New Lead Section[edit]

George Evelyn Hutchinson, described by many as the “Father of modern Ecology”, was born January 30,1903 in Cambridge, England.[1] He contributed for more than sixty years to the fields of limnology, systems ecology, radiation ecology, entomology, genetics, biogeochemistry, a mathematical theory of population growth, art history, philosophy, religion, and anthropology.[2] Although born in England, he spent nearly his entire professional life at Yale University with his focus on working with graduate students. [3] He is known as one of the first to combine ecology with mathematics.[4] He earned his degree in Zoology from Cambridge University but chose not to earn a doctorate, of which he would come to be proud of as he aged. [5] He then went to Italy where he would later return to study its lakes, art, and music. Cite error: There are <ref> tags on this page without content in them (see the help page). Next he travelled to South Africa where he discovered the field of limnology or the study of freshwater systems, on the shallow lakes near Cape Town. He would become an international expert on lakes and would author a four-volume Treatise on Limnology in 1957.[6] He was then offered a position teaching zoology at Yale University, which he accepted in 1928.[7] He travelled widely as part of his position, which allowed him to explore previously underexplored parts of the world. [8] It was during these travels that he authored his first book on the ecology of high-elevation lakes in India and the people that lived there, it was to be widely received by a large audience due to his skill as a writer. [9] Yale would prove to be the perfect place for his studies, as his graduate students would influence him to delve into studies he had never considered. [10] After retiring he returned to London, where he died May 17, 1991.[11] — Preceding unsigned comment added by MackenzieGlaze (talkcontribs) 18:55, 25 March 2014 (UTC)

Peer Review[edit]

For Professor Stuhl’s History of Ecology class, I will peer review the article on Olaus Murie using the five elements of a high-quality article and beginning with the lead section. This section is succinct and states information outlining what will be further expanded on later in the article without going into too much detail. This lead section does a great job introducing important ecological fields and linking them to their own pages on Wikipedia.

The structure of this article is clear in that it clearly defines what will be discussed under that heading. The sections seem to cover all of the important topics one may be interested in learning about Hutchinson. I would suggest possibly moving the “Personal Life” section to right after “Early Life and Education” and have “Beginning of Professional Career” follow. Also, I would suggest either changing the “Beginning of Professional Career” to just “Professional Career” or adding another section that expands on the rest of his professional Career. As a reader, I would be interested in what his entire professional career consisted of, not just the beginning.

In my opinion, I think that this article does a great job of equally discussing the aspects of Hutchinson’s life. His early life, education, personal life and professional life are all discussed in this article, which provides a comprehensive view of Hutchinson. The “Research” section of this article is significantly longer than any other section, but that makes sense because of the vast amount of research Hutchinson was involved in. Perhaps this section could be further divided into sections according to the type of research that was done in order to break down this large section.

I think that this article does a great job of providing factual information in a way that does not bias the article. The information seems to be very factual and cited appropriately. The awards section highlights the accomplishments of Hutchinson, so perhaps any information on critiques of his work could also be included in this article in order to be fully neutral.

Lastly, the sources that were used to write this article seem to be reliable, with both primary and secondary sources. There are a wide range of sources listed, many of which are published by Yale University Press or other reliable scientific journals. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Lizziewalters (talkcontribs) 00:21, 15 April 2014 (UTC)

Peer Review[edit]

Hi! I enjoyed reading your article on Hutchinson as it is very informational. The lead section is a great introduction of Hutchinson’s life and contributions, but manages to be concise as well. I agree with Lizzie that the personal life section could be moved after his early life. As for the Early Professional Career section, could it be combined with his research section? I know already the research section contains the most information and takes up most of the page but it seems that his research would be a part of his career. Even though, the research section is long, I feel that his research is the most significant part about him as a figure in ecology. I personally found the research section really interesting because of the diverse locations and subjects he studied. You could add another section, to discuss his influence on the study of ecology today that would help readers understand his significance. Perhaps this would help to balance out the research section too. The sources looks reliable however, the article by Nancy Slacks seems to dominate the sources list. Is there a way to condense this so it doesn't overwhelm the list? Lastly, I thought this article maintained an unbiased voice and presented information in a neutral way as to not sway the reader’s opinion. Overall, good work! Dcbru (talk) 05:26, 15 April 2014 (UTC)

Peer Review[edit]

I am student at Bucknell University writing a peer review for a History of Ecology class.

After the information I have found on G. Evelyn Hutchinson, almost every source I found talked about him being "The Father of Modern Ecology" and it was immediately mentioned in this article which I thought was important. Someone reading this article will know that he had a great impact on ecology. That was important to highlight early in the article. There was not as much information as there could have been on Hutchinson. Although his personal and early life were covered in great detail I thought there could have been a lot more information about his professional career. For a man who was highly praised, there could have been more details about his impacts and contributions. It seemed as if the article was giving all facts about his life. During his professional and research career it could have been drawn out and explained in more detail. I did notice that there was a brief part about his interest in limnology which through the research I have found on Hutchinson was great. Limnology seemed to be crucial to his career and perhaps, highlighting his research and findings in this area could make the article stronger. Overall, I think the article pinpoints the basics of the individual. The basic facts were mentioned but for those searching for great detail, there could be more information. The article does acknowledge all of what we need to know about Hutchinson and that is most important. — Preceding unsigned comment added by RyH11 (talkcontribs) 22:19, 15 April 2014 (UTC)

Further comments on content[edit]

Hi User:MackenzieGlaze! Very well done on this draft of your Wikipedia article. You've significantly expanded the treatment of Hutchinson, a crucial figure in the history of science, and the history of ecology in particular. You've received some helpful comments on structure and organization from your peers, and I hope you'll respond to those. I wanted to add some comments on content. I see you make wonderful use of Nancy Slack's recent book on Hutchinson, which helps you detail much of his research. Like your peers, I thought you might say a bit more about his work on ecosystem ecology in particular as well as the impact Hutchinson had on the study of ecology in the United States (especially through his students Lindeman and Odum). If Slack's book does not cover this, it seemed the obituaries you have in your bibliography would. Also, the article we read in class from Peter Taylor on "Technocratic Optimism, H.T. Odum, and the Partial Transformation of Ecological Metaphors after World War II" would be a superb source for building up this topic area within the research section. Keep up the great work! --Enstandrew (talk) 18:16, 17 April 2014 (UTC)

  1. ^ Slack, Nancy G., G. Evelyn Hutchinson and the Invention of Modern Ecology. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011. xi.
  2. ^ Slobodkin, L.B. “An Appreciation: George Evelyn Hutchinson.” Journal of Animal Ecology Vol. 62, no2 (1993): 390-394. Accessed February 24, 2014. http://www.jstor.org/stable/5370
  3. ^ Slack, Nancy G., G. Evelyn Hutchinson and the Invention of Modern Ecology. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011. 3.
  4. ^ Slack, Nancy G., G. Evelyn Hutchinson and the Invention of Modern Ecology. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011. 2.
  5. ^ Slack, Nancy G., G. Evelyn Hutchinson and the Invention of Modern Ecology. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011. 5.
  6. ^ Slack, Nancy G., G. Evelyn Hutchinson and the Invention of Modern Ecology. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011. 5.
  7. ^ Slack, Nancy G., G. Evelyn Hutchinson and the Invention of Modern Ecology. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011. 6.
  8. ^ Slack, Nancy G., G. Evelyn Hutchinson and the Invention of Modern Ecology. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011. 6.
  9. ^ Slack, Nancy G., G. Evelyn Hutchinson and the Invention of Modern Ecology. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011. 6.
  10. ^ Slack, Nancy G., G. Evelyn Hutchinson and the Invention of Modern Ecology. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011. 8.
  11. ^ Slack, Nancy G., G. Evelyn Hutchinson and the Invention of Modern Ecology. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011. 369.