Talk:Gamboge

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Sources, etc[edit]

OK, we've got this sentence:

It is used to dye Buddhist monks' robes. [1][2]

  1. ^ Hanelt, Peter (11 May 2001). "Mansfeld's Encyclopedia of Agricultural and Horticultural Crops: (Except Ornamentals)". Springer. Retrieved 8 August 2011. 
  2. ^ [Anna] Check |authorlink= value (help) (1990). "Recreation-Plants that entertain us". Plants for people. London: Natural History Museum Publications. p. 206. ISBN 0-565-01094-8. 

Problem is, I can't get the Google Books page to load -- it tells me "You have reached a page that is unavailable for viewing". Another problem is that I've got a source that contradicts that -- the reason I was reading about gamboge in the first place was a long section in it in the book "Color" by Victoria Finlay (ISBN 0812971426). She also discusses saffron, of course, and there's this:

In Tibet, robes were usually dyed with turmeric, which was cheap and the color of the simple earth. And in Thailand the monks' robes are often colored with the heart of the jackfruit, and once a year they go down to the river in the early morning with their fruits and their pots, and they color their robes again. Nowadays, of course, many robes are synthetically dyed...

So perhaps all we need to say is that Buddhist robes are sometimes dyed with gamboge; but casual readers will assume from that sentence that all Buddhist robes are dyed with gamboge (as I first thought the sentence was saying.)

The book has some other real interesting stuff about gamboge -- such as the dangerous gamboge coming out of Cambodia that sometimes had unspent bullets in it... --jpgordon::==( o ) 20:53, 7 November 2011 (UTC)

Lewington writes:

Gamboge has been used as a pigment for centuries in the Far East. It was the traditional dye for the silk robes of Buddhist monks and priests and the unique brilliance of its colour made it the prime ingredient of certain yellow paints, as well as special varnishes and inks.

As Buddhism is spread all over different climate zones and commerce routes it seems natural to me that some plants may not be available in some areas and may be replaced by others, gamboge in Cambodia, turmeric in Tibet, jackfruit in Thailand, etc. The wording in the article is fine now, the reader who wishes to know more can just click on the robe link and find out that other pigments are used too. The mayor of Yurp (talk) 23:15, 7 November 2011 (UTC)

A tree called Gamboge[edit]

Is there not a tree called a "gamboge"? There is according to Wikitionary, which gives the definition of the word as a tree. This will have to be put in the article somewhere. ACEOREVIVED (talk) 19:49, 29 August 2012 (UTC)