Talk:Gay-Lussac's law

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Amonton's Law[edit]

It has been speculated that Amonton was the first to note that Pressure was in direct relationship to Temperature. Should this be added to this article, noting that the Gay-Lussac Law is sometimes refered to as Amonton's Law? Dreamm 00:24, 15 December 2006 (UTC)

I have edited the clarification about the name from "Amonton's law" to "Amonton's law of Pressure-Temperature" in order to emphasize the difference between this law and other laws formulated by Amonton about friction (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_Amontons#Amontons.27_Laws_of_Friction). Besides I have added some bibliographic support about the date of the discovery and/or publication of this work.George Rodney Maruri Game (talk) 18:37, 16 July 2010 (UTC)

Add a Graphic?[edit]

Should there be a simple graphic that shows the relationship between pressure and temperature (as pressure increases, temperature increases)?

I agree. An additional illustration to show the relationship using idealized hard spheres would also be nice.-- Beland 07:01, 7 April 2007 (UTC)
I added a diagram similar to traditional ones demonstrating the need to increase the pressure to keep the volume the same as temperature increases - hopefully also showing the brownian motion idea. Egmason (talk) 03:40, 19 July 2012 (UTC)
What's wanted is an animated figure, like those shown for Charles's and Boyle's laws, but showing pressure changing (as in the Boyle's law figure) with changing temperature (as in the Charles's law figure) and or v.v. Graham.Fountain | Talk 12:23, 9 September 2012 (UTC)

No name? Pressure law? Maybe not Gay-Lussac's law[edit]

I was taught at high school that this law is not named after anyone, and is normally called the "pressure law". Here is what I have found at http://hypertextbook.com/physics/thermal/gas-laws/

The pressure of a gas is directly proportional to its temperature when volume is constant. Symbolically …

P ∝ T

An isochoric process is one that takes place without any change in volume.

This relationship doesn't really have a name, but I have heard it called the "pressure law" or (mistakenly) "Gay-Lussac's law".

The basic gas law relationships … The pressure of a gas is inversely proportional to its volume when temperature is constant. This relationship is known as Boyle's law or Mariotte's law. The volume of a gas is directly proportional to its temperature when pressure is constant. This relationship is known as Charles' law or Gay-Lussac's law. The pressure of a gas is directly proportional to its temperature when volume is constant. This relationship is not associated with any particular scientist.

--Wei Cheng 06:07, 13 August 2007 (UTC)

Gay-Lussac's Law is *Not* the Pressure-Temperature Law[edit]

Wei Cheng is correct. The pressure-temperature law has been misidentified as Gay-Lussac's law for years. You will not find any original references to it as such and only chemistry texts and documents that cite chemistry texts incorrectly call it Gay-Lussac's law.

Gay-Lussac's law is the law of combining volumes. The volume-temperature law is identified as either Charles' law or Gay-Lussac's law. Historically, it was originally called Gay-Lussac's law until some prior experimental work led to it being associated with Charles. There is disagreement as to whether Gay-Lussac or Charles' should receive priority. Books I've read state that the volume-temperature law is called Gay-Lussac's in some regions of the world and Charles' law in other regions.

Textbooks often use other textbooks as references and this is the reason this error continues to propagate.

Alanearhart 01:30, 19 August 2007 (UTC) ........... —Preceding unsigned comment added by 112.203.98.133 (talk) 02:56, 16 November 2009 (UTC)

Technically speaking, this sentence is incorrect: "though it is more usually applied to his law of combining volumes, the first listed here." It is more properly applied, but that doesn't mean it is more often applied today. I think if you asked many chemists which one is Gay-Lussac's law, most would pick the latter. Samer (talk) 14:16, 24 May 2011 (UTC)

Units[edit]

Why the hell are the units given in atmospheres? The SI units of pressure are Pascals.

And as for it not being Gay-Lussac's Law, that is indeed the way I was taught it. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 82.15.143.156 (talk) 19:48, 4 March 2012 (UTC)