Talk:Geological history of oxygen

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Inaccuracies[edit]

  • This page has many inaccuracies. For example, what exactly does "Of course, in the absence of plants, photosynthesis was slower in the Precambrian" mean? Cyanobacteria produced vast quantities of oxygen via oxygenic photosynthesis prior to the evolution of plants. In addition the claim that there were no mass extinctions prior to the Cambrian. This is almost certainly wrong - the great oxidation wiped out the majority of life on Earth around 2.4Ga-1.8Ga, according to current understanding. I don't have time to review and edit the page at the moment, perhaps somebody would like to take a look at it? 20:35, 11 May 2011 User:139.222.200.73

Furter inaccurcies: it is stated 2% oxygen is needed for collagen production. Next section it states "40% of current levels" which would be about 8% for collagen production. Which is it?1812ahill (talk) 13:40, 17 July 2012 (UTC)

Source of Evolutionary Diversification[edit]

This page first suggests oxygenation was a driver for evolutionary diversification in the Cambrian period. Later, it says oxygenation is simply a prerequisite for the diversification. I think this just needs a little clarification. It seems oxygenation is more of a prerequisite. It brought about the opportunity for more complexity in a given speices, but the driving force for diversity seems to be coevolution. As more complex organisms began to appear, their interactions with each other required more adaptation. Kkennedy657 (talk) 21:53, 1 October 2014 (UTC)

Cyanobacteria[edit]

I feel some more info on the photosynthetic organisms would be helpful. The first photosynthetic organisms used sulfuric compounds with oxygen as the waste product. Cyanobacteria eventually developed photosynthesis that used water as fuel and while still expelling oxygen. The cyanobacteria had a new, more efficient way to photosynthesize. This made cyanobacteria the main producer of atmospheric oxygen. Kkennedy657 (talk) 22:32, 1 October 2014 (UTC)