Talk:German-American Day

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Is there a typo here? George H.W. Bush was not elected president until 1988.

Perhaps "Vice" president Bush? Or it was instituted by president Reagan?
Right. This says that Reagan signed the holiday into law in 1987. I will look for some other sources, to check. Awolf002 22:22, 6 October 2005 (UTC)
I removed the HW reference. The first Google hit for "German-American Day" is to a Geocities page that includes a quote from HW at the beginning, and I think some editor read this and got confused. Tempshill 23:17, 6 October 2005 (UTC)

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Germany-American Day uses the founding date of Germantown, Pennsylvania which was actually a Dutch settlement?[edit]

So, according to this article Germany-American Day uses the founding date of Germantown, Pennsylvania "the first German settlement in the original thirteen American colonies". Looing at the Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania itself it says "Although the town's name indicates otherwise, Germantown was founded not by Germans, but by Dutch settlers[1], augmented with a much smaller number of people from present-day Germany, in 1681.". Ok, now I'm utterly confused. Looking at the history, it seems User:Rex Germanus contributed the majority of information change from "German settlers" to "Dutch settlers" but as I'm not familiar to the topic I can't comment on the reliability of his sources. In any case, it would probably be useful if someone could double-check the information given. CharonX/talk 02:51, 6 October 2007 (UTC)

Simplified answer: 300 years ago there was no big distinction between Dutch and German, like there was no one between Canadians and Americans. Dutch groups often included some Germans from the "hinterland"... --188.107.221.249 (talk) 20:13, 2 December 2009 (UTC)

I would add: these families were of Dutch extraction, and were Mennonites who became Quakers. They left Holland partly for religious reasons (believe it or not)and subsequently left Germany for the same reason. Quakers had problems wherever they were, which is why Penn wanted to found his colony and gather them all in. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Pibolata (talkcontribs) 14:04, 15 September 2011 (UTC)