Talk:German-speaking Community of Belgium

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Is Eupen-Malmedy another name for East Cantons? -- Dissident 02:30, 29 Feb 2004 (UTC)

Eupen-Malmedy is the term used by the German nationalist movement to describe the lands lost to Belgium after WWI. The vast majority were German speaking but some were French. It is a former region of the Prussian Rheinland. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 125.84.182.95 (talk) 10:49, 15 June 2010 (UTC)

No, It isn't that are just names of some of the villages but I have another question. Are you shure it always belonged to Germany berfore? I always tought it came to Belgian with the Belgian indipendance in 1830 from "de verenigde provinciën" and was given to Germany in 1839 with "het verdrag van de ... artikkelen". I'm not shure so I didn't wrote it on the mainpage but can someone check it out? Gitaarfreak(Dutch wikipedia)

"Are you sure that it always belonged to Germany before?"

I am not sure about the specific situation of the area before the French Revolution (although I believe that the Holy Roman Empire comprised most of what is now Belgium, anyway), but I am positive that the region formed part of Prussia as from the time of the Congress of Vienna (i.e. as from 1815) With regard to Malmedy and Waimes (the only francophone towns in the area) the Prussians were liberal enough to accept the use of French in administrative matters.--136.8.150.6 (talk) 09:09, 20 March 2009 (UTC)


May we have a map indicating where the East Cantons are? -- Kaihsu 16:34, 2004 May 7 (UTC)

Interpretation[edit]

I'm not sure how to interpret The East Cantons were part of the Rhine Province, Prussia, Germany until 1920, from the article. Does it mean 'the Rhine province of Prussia in Germany', or were the East Cantons a part of Rhine Province at one stage, which was replaced with Prussia, and then later with Germany? or something totally different? Felix the Cassowary 30 June 2005 12:37 (UTC)

The Rhine Province belongs to Prussia and Prussia belongs to Germany. I guess this is a US idiom, they write things like "Seattle, Washington" all the time, meaning: Seattle, which is in Washington. --Chl 30 June 2005 14:06 (UTC)
Thanks! I've reworded the article so it's clear. (I'm familiar with that American idiom, but I don't think I've ever seen it before with more than two places so it started looking like a list.) Felix the Cassowary 1 July 2005 11:23 (UTC)

WALLONIA, FRANCE, GERMANY AND EUPEN

I suppose that if Wallonia joins France, Eupen and the German-speaking community will join Germany...that´s logical.

Not necessarily. The area of Sankt Vith has much more historical links with Luxembourg. Furthermore, the local dialict that is spoken there is very close to Luxembourgish language. --Lebob-BE (talk) 16:02, 29 July 2008 (UTC)

If in fact Standard German is used as the official and legal language, whereas most or all people also speak dialect (Luxembourgian variant) this would pose a problem if this region left Belgium and Wallonia for Lux. The majority language by far in Lux. is French. What if any role does French have in the region? I understand the historical and cultural links but the links to Germany via standard German and history or just as strong. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 222.212.69.87 (talk) 14:41, 10 November 2010 (UTC)

huge blank space[edit]

Just a cosmetic problem,might want to fix it.Raspberrysnapple 04:11, 4 May 2007 (UTC)

Include languages[edit]

I think it would be a good idea to add the different languages spoken in the area (Limburgish and Luxembourgish) - I was surprised, when I visited Eupen and St. Vith most people there don't speak Standard German, Limburgish seems to be somewhat closer to Dutch.Johnny2323 (talk) 02:27, 18 April 2009 (UTC)

I thought they teach standard HIGH German in all the schools in the DGB? What you heard is local middle German dialect. I assume they can speak both like in many parts of middle and Upper Germany. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 119.85.101.45 (talk) 08:12, 21 June 2010 (UTC)

Name[edit]

Why is the Community named "German-speaking Community of Belgium", while the French and Flemish ones are named French Community of Belgium and Flemish Community? — Preceding unsigned comment added by Dotfiret (talkcontribs) 08:53, 4 June 2011 (UTC)

The word "German" refers to the German language, but it also refers to Germany. I think "German-speaking" has been chosen to emphasize the difference, Germany had quite a bad reputation in eastern Belgium, the area had been occupied by Germany during WWII and the result was the destruction of many cities and villages in the area - including many civilian casualties. Another possible explanation: The community comprises two separate territories (see the map in the article). Historically, the two territories belonged to the Duchy of Luxembourg and the Duchy of Limburg, people living there spoke (and many still speak) different dialects, which means the community is not as coherent as the French or Flemish community. Johnny2323 (talk) 02:55, 15 September 2011 (UTC)
You get some very political correct people that refuse to speak of Germans. The Germans inhabiting the Eupen Malmedy area are also quite timid. I've been told that this was for reasons for intimidation by the Belgian occupation personnel. Not sure what that all included, I can just guess. --41.151.241.243 (talk) 13:41, 8 August 2012 (UTC)