Talk:German language

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88.65.81.80[edit]

88.65.81.80 Please stop reverting valid edits. It would appear that English is not your first language. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Archlinux (talkcontribs) 11:40, 3 May 2014 (UTC)

Mistakable sentence[edit]

Quote from the section "Noun inflection": Inflection for case on the noun itself is required in the singular for strong masculine and neuter nouns in the genitive and sometimes in the dative. Both of these cases are losing ground to substitutes in informal speech. The dative ending is considered somewhat old-fashioned in many contexts and often dropped.

One must distinguish here between the wide-spread loss of the genitive case in informal speech and that of the dative ending. The genitive is not much used in colloquial German (des Mannes > von dem Mann), but there is no tendency to avoid the dative. Only the noun ending (dem Manne) is usually lost, but the dative as such is stable because the article retains its dative form.

— Preceding unsigned comment added by 82.83.226.12 (talk) 19 October 2012‎

Latin standard ?[edit]

Article states that Latin (or is English the ment language ?) comprices 26 "standard letters". I believe that for instance the "Æ" -letter was used in Latin, if so standard Latin uses atleast 27 letters. In any case the phrase "26 standard letters" possible could be written more clearly. Standard Latin or standard English ? Or am I wrong about the "Æ"-letter and too meticulous ? Boeing720 (talk) 22:13, 1 August 2014 (UTC)

"Æ" doesn't have any linguistic significance beyond that of "AE", it's a purely "typographical" device. --Pfold (talk) 07:59, 2 August 2014 (UTC)
There are Latin scripts that have Æ as a separate letter, such as Danish or Norwegian, but the ligature does not occur in the original Classical Latin alphabet. It is a medieval innovation. --Florian Blaschke (talk) 19:52, 2 September 2014 (UTC)

L2 speakers[edit]

The currently given number of 80 million L2 speakers is suspiciously high, especially considering List of languages by total number of speakers – as an IP has recently synthesised, this would mean close to 200 million speakers worldwide all in all, a figure not usually encountered. Ever since Kwamikagami had added the number of second language speakers to the infobox back in 2005, it has been subject to constant seemingly arbitrary manipulation. (I'll never understand how uncommented changes to figures can go through completely without a reaction on a heavily watched article like this one.) Eventually, in 2007, after a "consensus change" to 20 million speakers discussed on talk, that number was changed to 35 million speakers by R9tgokunks, who finally added a citation. It was in December 2007 when this figure, after having been lowered in the meanwhile to 28 million for the hell who knows what kind of reason, was raised to 80 million by an IP, whose only rationale was a reference to the "authority" of the German Wikipedia, where 80 million foreign-language speakers are claimed without any source; it is basically a Fantasiezahl. In any event, I have to assume that the cited source gives no more and no less than 35 million speakers and therefore I am changing it back to that figure. Of course, it would be great if somebody could actually verify this figure or report what exactly the source cited really says. That's the problem with offline sources, which only the addition of quotations can remedy. --Florian Blaschke (talk) 01:30, 21 August 2014 (UTC)

This is a useful compilation of sources. Almost all sources give a far smaller figure of L2 speakers than 80 million, only the Eurobarometer survey reports 55 million for Europe alone. On the reasons for the vast discrepancies I can only speculate. --Florian Blaschke (talk) 03:21, 21 August 2014 (UTC)

It seams that some people did not hear yet from the notion of German-speaking Europe. The number of 55 million L2-speakers refers only to the European Union (see the diagram "German foreign language EU"). If you want to get the figure for whole Europe, you have to add at least the German speakers from Norway, Serbia, Bosnia, Belarus, Ukraine and Russia. But the worldwide number of German L2-speakers is surely higher than 80 million. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 95.114.99.249 (talk) 12:33, 16 September 2014 (UTC)

German dialects[edit]

The mostly wide spoken German dialect in the world is English and not Bavarian. But English is a dialect with several armies and navies. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 77.2.18.203 (talk) 12:56, 4 September 2014 (UTC)

Native Speakers[edit]

This page was deeply messed-up, by a bad reference in the Infobox. I removed the bad reference as that makes the page look much better, almost correct, except I am not sure the Infobox is complete. The bad reference appeared right after the second language speakers. Here is the bad reference:

| authorlink = National Geographic | title = National Geographic Collegiate Atlas of the World | publisher = R.R. Donnelley & Sons Company |date=April 2006 | location = Willard, Ohio | pages = 257–299 | isbn = 978-0-7922-3662-7}}</ref>[verification needed] (55 million (2005) in EU claimed by Eurobarometer[1]

I could not figure out how to fix this. If you can clear this up, please do.

Nick Beeson (talk) 19:26, 11 September 2014 (UTC)

  1. ^ Eurobarometer