Talk:Gettysburg Address

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Requested correction of broken links in Notes section[edit]

The URLs for the links to the images of the Bliss copy (note e) are no longer correct. The correct URLs are:
Page 1: http://www.papersofabrahamlincoln.org/documentimages/GABliss1.jpg
Page 2: http://www.papersofabrahamlincoln.org/documentimages/GABliss2.jpg
Page 3: http://www.papersofabrahamlincoln.org/documentimages/GABliss3.jpg
Page 4: http://www.google.com/ — Preceding unsigned comment added by Redmantrolls101 (talkcontribs) 16:32, 22 February 2015 (UTC) Jfmcneirney (talk) 22:39, 19 November 2013 (UTC)

Done Thanks, Celestra (talk) 04:51, 20 November 2013 (UTC)

Brackets and "Under God"[edit]

Another user has edit warred to place brackets around the phrase "Under God" in the text on the basis that "There is still considerable debate in the historian community, over the use of the words "under god". Thus it is best to bracket the the words so that both side may be represented" [1]. Sources I've found, however, all include the phrase in the text: Associated Press, NY Times University of Maryland University of Minnesota Encyclopedia Britannica National Park Service, etc. Calidum 16:58, 26 April 2014 (UTC)

I read the change-comment as the editor stating that because there is some difference of opinion whether Lincoln should have used the phrase, then it should be set off in some manner. I do not recall anything in the WP:MOS which would allow this TEDickey (talk) 18:18, 26 April 2014 (UTC)
As I have noted at MartianColony's talk page:
The section that you are editing is the Bliss version, which includes the words "under God", and does not bracket them. You can't change a direct quote. The question of whether or not Lincoln used these words is already covered in the Usage of "under God" section, and the conclusion is that most likely yes, he did.
I don't see anything that needs to be done with either the quotation or the rest of the article. - Mike Rosoft (talk) 05:09, 27 April 2014 (UTC)

Ambiguous caption[edit]

"To Lincoln's right is his bodyguard, Ward Hill Lamon."

Does "right" mean from his perspective, or as we are looking at it? 81.132.196.237 (talk) 01:17, 18 January 2015 (UTC)

The person sitting just behind Lincoln to his right appears to be his bodyguard. TEDickey (talk) 11:39, 18 January 2015 (UTC)

Similarities to Pericles' Funeral Speech[edit]

In the Section "Lincoln's sources", only Garry Willis is cited as discussing the parallels between the Gettysburg Address and Pericles's funeral oration in his 1992 book "Lincoln at Gettysburg" (and then McPherson in reviewing said book). However, this parallel was also discussed earlier by Louis Warren in 1946, or perhaps even earlier, in his book "Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address: An Evaluation" [1].

Warren writes: "Only one other great oration has been compared favorably with that of Lincoln at Gettysburg. That is the funeral oration by the immortal Pericles at Athens. There are many striking similarities in these two speeches. Both were delivered where brave men had fallen in battle. In Greece, Athenians had fought against Spartans, North against South, Greek against Greek. In America, the ground was where Puritan grappled with Cavalier, North faced the South, and American met American. Both Lincoln and Pericles began their orations with direct references to the contributions of the "fathers." Pericles began, "I will begin then with our ancestors, our fathers inherited, etc." Lincoln opened with, "Four score and seven years ago, our fathers, etc." It is significant that both orators, separated in time by centuries, should begin by commemorating the works of the fathers."

While there may be other sources of this comparison (as evidenced by the first sentences in the Warren quote above), I believe it is misleading to only cite a single source for this idea and that Warren's work should be included as well in the article.

Discrepancy with Wikipedia "Abraham Lincoln" article[edit]

In a photo caption that accompanies this article, it states that there are two confirmed photos of Lincoln at Gettysburg. However, in the Wikipedia "Abraham Lincoln" article, a photo caption states that there is only one confirmed photo.Bunkyray5 (talk) 02:45, 3 April 2015 (UTC)

  1. ^ "Louis Warren, "Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address: An Evaluation" (Charles E. Merrill Publishing Co. 1946), pp. 18".