Talk:Glass float

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Extremely Cool[edit]

My grandmother had one as big as a person's head that she found after one particularly fierce storm on the Oregon coast. She said when she found it, it was wrapped up in old netting and covered with barnacles and seaweed. The real McCoy. This was back in the 1950s. She cleaned it and it was a thing of beauty; deep blue green, perfectly round and sparkling in the sun where she kept it by the window. For beachcombers these glass balls were like pearls from the sea. Rare, beautiful and exotic. My grandmother had several that she accumulated over the years on the coast at Lincoln City Oregon. Too bad they are a thing of the past. It always amazed me that these floats, both large and small could make the journey across the Pacific all the way from Japan. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 172.190.150.213 (talk) 04:42, 12 February 2010 (UTC)