Talk:Glasses

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Former good article Glasses was one of the Natural sciences good articles, but it has been removed from the list. There are suggestions below for improving the article to meet the good article criteria. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
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Safety glasses[edit]

I think two images is overkill. Further, the right image is very hard to see at that resolution and with that background color. Daniel Quinlan 23:47, Mar 26, 2005 (UTC)

Point taken, those in the left hand image are the traditional safety glasses (complete with safety sticker even!) so they are the first and logical choice. However the second image shows the newer style that the original section made reference too. This style is in fact very good as they fit snugly reducing the likelihood of the murphys law chips slipping through the air gap the older style creates. On the one hand you have safety glasses that the old-timers would recognize, on the other you have the newer fandangled (but extremely good) ones.
I made the images small so as to not overwhelm the reader, would a different (black?) background for the second set make all the difference? . -- Graibeard 10:08, 27 Mar 2005 (UTC)

Probably newish comments (some undated) formerly posted at the top of the talk page[edit]

"simple magnifying lenses for reading that are used to treat mild nearsightedness"

Do nearsighted people need eyeglasses for reading? More explanation seems to be called for.

S.

I can't speak in general, but I'm shortsighted (about 2.5 / 3.5 ) and I prefer to use glasses for reading. Just feels more comfortable -- Tarquin

The quoted statement is perhaps a misconception. The common reason why older people often need some sort of magnifying lens for reading is because they have presbyopia (a condition where the lens of the eye has stiffened and has lost its ability to focus on close objects). Mrwojo

I personally use glasses when reading because, with the myopia and astigmatism, the letters are blurred unless I hold the document about 6 inches from my face. Like many people, I prefer to read at a further distance. However, like many near-sighted people, I do take off my glasses sometimes after a long amount of reading before settling on to more. For whatever reason, it feels like it reduces eyestrain to read without glasses for a while. My hypothesis would be that the muscles of the eye are stretching in a different manner. -Fuzzy 13:20, 19 Jan 2005 (UTC)

Ironic[edit]

Is it a coincidence that when I looked up "glasses" on wikipedia, the font automatically changed on my browser to such a small size that I would need glasses to read the page?