Talk:Google WiFi

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Range[edit]

The current active DHCP range is user-64-9-232-0.googlewifi.com to user-64-9-239-255.googlewifi.com .--Radiosband 17:10, 20 October 2007 (UTC)

righttoc?[edit]

put a rightTOC template on here? Emesee mobi (talk) 21:13, 27 September 2008 (UTC)

bends or curves meaning the signal receives the electrons from the air. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 64.9.243.23 (talk) 20:41, 3 June 2010 (UTC)

technology[edit]

I noticed on a google affiliated website or some sort of diagram where they sell their adapters they advertise the signal frequencies of each. For instance, they say the 90 dollar ruckus picks up a signal that the 60 dollar one doesnt. They say the signal comes from everywhere, where the ruckus gets received from a type of..ecliptic or flat plane. This is not true. You can curve the ruckus signal by putting it on a reflective dish (lamp medium height with metal aluminum or cheap material with a reflective surface), the signal wont get lost if you simply tilt the ruckus sideways against the reflective dish (a house lamp with tinfoil) at almost all peak times. Point the dish away from the main signal source so it can bend. There is Most likely one signal source near your residence not ever a shared signal and not likely two that everyone shares. Putting it on or near a wall is a bad solution. For instance, it goes through the transparent wood of the door therefore bends (pointing the tilted 'lamp' dish away from the signal). The best solution is a ext cord near a door or window from which the signal enters. If the complex is not pointed towards the signal (from left to right eg behind or completely obstructed by concrete walls), there is no need to get google wifi for you may have lots of breaks or a shared weak signal with a 56k (recommended for logging on). The signal comes and goes through access and sharing, I identified this specifically on not being able to log onto secure servers as the signal renews a connection by constantly reconnecting onto the repeater.

A signal works like a transportation device, it vibrates the electrons in a certain area into a wave which pulsates to another area of vibration (or cloning) the electrons at a certain level. This vibration is how electro-magnetic waves transport electric signals in the form of data. This is how data is finished or unfinished and why the electrons (i call them electrolytes) bend to find the signal. Why not add a statement on how data is transferred via google wifi or with the use of its technology? Interesting note here about vibrant new economy in its technology clothes etc—Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.55.212.73 (talk) 22:02, 6 June 2010 (UTC)

"GoogleWiFi" = "Google WiFi"?[edit]

Section Wireless access: is "GoogleWiFi" the same as "Google WiFi" or is there a difference. --Mortense? (talk) 09:52, 8 April 2012 (UTC)