Talk:Grain elevator

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Headline text[edit]

I removed two of the harder nob to see pictures of the grain elevators. Please try not to add more of them... the article was becoming a gallery of grain elevators. -- BMIComp (talk, HOWS MY DRIVING) 17:09, 20 October 2005 (UTC)

Regional Variation[edit]

Elevators began in Buffalo, New York in the 1840s (I need to double check). They evolved out of flat wherehouses where grain was stored privously. In eastern Canada and the United States, they build small elevators in existing towns, on existing tracks. In western Canada, rail sidings were built every 7 to 7&1/2 miles apart in unsettled land, elevators were then built there and then towns grew up around them. The Railway companies used this power to dictate the settlement patterns and town planning of western Canada. They also dictated to the grain companies how to build their elevators, as so called "standard elevator". This is why western Canadian elevators have distinctive size and shape, all similar to each other but different from other regions. Also I know that completely different methods of grain storage and transport are used in Euorpe and Australia, perhaps there should be a mention of this in the article for comparison's sake. Or a link maybe? I'll get back you with sources on the other info when I can find it. Kevlar67 20:41, 30 December 2005 (UTC)

Saskachewan[edit]

Ares look diffrent but are very common and welll known there more of a tower could we have picture of that?

Difficulty and Danger[edit]

Can anyone qualify the statement that it is a "problem" to separate regular and genetically-modified corn from one another? I doubt normal farmers care. I bet it is hard to find a place that will guarantee that they will never mix. In the states, I doubt many people care. What exactly is the danger? Political, agricultural? Will they blow up?  ;)

Economic. Farmers can get MUCH higher returns on corn guaranteed not to be GMO. I know the hard science wonks think anti-GMO sentiment is a lot of pseudoscientific hooey believed only by the not-so-bright, but I'm not satisfied that the researchers working on GMO crops even consider for a microsecond the possibility of allergic reactions. Soy proteins being expressed in corn sound irrelevant (if there's a benefit to the modification, of course) unless you have a life-threatening allergy to soy. I suppose too many science wonks dismiss medically proven food allergies as being psychological (often for these people, all health problems they themselves don't experience are psychological in nature), or think people with them are sad, pathetic, objects of pity but it's better that they die in agony than anyone else be even a tiny bit inconvenienced. At least those are the two attitudes I get from the science wonk community, especially since the brazil nut fiasco in which test subjects died. Sad, really. --NellieBly (talk) 06:51, 15 August 2008 (UTC)

Weyburn Inland Terminal[edit]

I've deleted the statement, The largest grain elevator in North America is the Weyburn Inland Terminal, until a citation can be found to back it up. The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan doesn't say it's the largest; it seems like if it was, they would say so. -- RoySmith (talk) 21:59, 1 December 2007 (UTC)

I know that it was the first farmer Co-op inland terminal in Canada, other than that it is news to me. Kermit C — Preceding unsigned comment added by KermitCrack (talkcontribs) 09:16, 9 April 2012 (UTC)

what is the dangerous part of grain elevators? Why did they blow up? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 64.126.93.201 (talk) 14:28, 20 January 2008 (UTC)

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Monopolies[edit]

The source (Testimony taken by Interstate Commerce Commission, October 15--November 23, 1906, in matter of relations of common carriers to the grain trade, 59th Congress, Senate Document #278, Washington: Government Printing Office, 1907, pg 28, 34-35. (available on print.google)) was taken from Robert Watke an article about a non-notable person I redirected here. It could be used to create a section on grain monopolies in the past. ALXVA (talk) 13:59, 26 June 2010 (UTC)