Talk:Great Appalachian Valley

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Great Valley[edit]

I made a general expansion of this article, adding sections, especially a geography section, and citing references. I removed the claim that the Great Valley includes the St. Lawrence River valley as I had not heard that before and could not find any references that mentioned it. The most northernly extend of the valley I could find reference to was the Champlain lowlands. In any case, I hope this is an improvement and opens a route for more -- the history section could be expanded with info on the Civil War and the colonial migrations at least. There could be info on the use of the valley by Indians and its cession by the Iroquois at the Treaty of Lancaster, etc. Pfly 08:33, 31 October 2006 (UTC)


Is the Great Valley area of Pennsylvania part of this Great Valley? I'd love to connect them. I live on the north face of the southern ridge in Malvern, PA. Our school district is called Great Valley School District. Mjchonoles 12:10, 31 October 2006 (UTC)

I'm not sure. I've always had trouble figuring out quite where the valley is in Pennsylvania. It seems to get pretty vague. But the first reference, the PDF http://www.priweb.org/ed/TFGuide/NE/topo/topo_files2/topo_pdfs/ne_topo2.pdf has nice maps of the valley in PA. By its maps, Malvern would not be in the Great Valley. Its quite close to Philadelphia isn't it? The Great Valley as I currently understand it runs more in the region of Carlisle, Lebanon, Reading, and Allentown. But a quick check shows the Great Valley School District is down there in Malvern area.. I wonder how it got that name. I'm not sure. Some might consider the Great Valley in PA is extend that far east, but I haven't found a source that defines it that way. Another idea is the Malvern area is located on the road that leads from Philadelphia to the Great Valley -- the Great Wagon Road is today's route 30 and 340 to Lancaster, York, etc. As I understand it, the road doesn't get to the Great Valley until crossing South Mountain near Gettysburg. But the great wagon road from Philadelphia was probably called the "Great Valley Road", and passed through the Malvern area. Maybe the school district got its name that way? I'm just not sure.. I'd like to add more on the Great Wagon Road to this page if I find the time... it would be interesting to link the school district in a description of the road, if that is how it got its name... Pfly 16:27, 31 October 2006 (UTC)
The Great Valley is a geological feature -- it appears that it is one of the biggest of the rolling ridge/valley systems in the Piedmont areas. It goes e-w throughout most of Chester County.Mjchonoles 03:55, 1 November 2006 (UTC)
Yea, that's what I've discovered in trying to look into it a little. I found various places online that describe the valley between about Valley Forge to Coatesville and west into Lancaster County as "the Great Valley". I'd never heard of that before, learn something new every day! I see on maps that the valley is bounded by North Valley Hills and South Valley Hills and has streams like Valley Run, Valley Creek, and Little Valley Creek. There are roads in the valley with names like Valley Road, Valley Avenue. Valley Road seems to go west all the way to Quarryville. The topography clearly shows a distinctive valley stretching east-west from near Philadelphia to Lancaster County. USGS maps and GNIS placenames seem vague on the valley's name, but there is a "Great Valley Mills" "locale" there. I tried to find out how it got its name and whether it is confused with or considered part of the Great Appalachian Valley, but found such info hard to find; except that it may be related to a Welsh word Tredyffin. I suspect there are many valleys around the world called Great Valley -- it is a rather general phrase -- and my guess is that this Great Valley is not the Great Appalachian Valley, even though it seems to have been the main route from Philadelphia TO the Great Appalachian Valley. How complicated Pennsylvania geography is! Like... I still can't figure out is there are two Kittatinny Mountains or one long one. ..and thanks Tygart! I'll keep an eye open for St Lawrence as part of the Great Valley. If nothing else the Champlain lowlands connect the valley TO the St Lawrence. Pfly 06:27, 1 November 2006 (UTC)
Researching more, found this nice geologic / physiographic map of Pennsylvania: http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/topogeo/maps/map13.pdf ..the Great Valley Region running through Chester County is, as Mjchonoles said, Piedmont region.. the long straight valley is pretty clearly colored as "lowland piedmont" surrounded by "upland piedmont". The Great Appalachian Valley is labeled rather large as "Great Valley Section". Just thought I'd post this nice map link here. Pfly 06:16, 5 November 2006 (UTC)

Bravo to Pfly on the expansion! Great job! I got the northern extension to the St Lawrence from the online Encyclopedia Britannica... ('Great Appalachian Valley' article)... Of course that doesn't prove anything! Valerius Tygart 22:45, 31 October 2006 (UTC)


roads[edit]

trival fact-checkinq quibble re: roads in the great valley - I-75 doesn't go to Cleveland - it runs through Toledo, Dayton and Cincinnati and runs parallel to the old Dixie Highway and even older Great Trail —Preceding unsigned comment added by 216.246.148.125 (talk) 22:53, 28 March 2008 (UTC)

Great Appalachian Valley[edit]

This article seems entirely missing the geologic history of the formation. How was it formed, etc. 184.144.163.241 (talk) 04:56, 4 January 2011 (UTC)