Talk:Greek Revival architecture

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/Archive 1

Saint Petersburg Bourse[edit]

I appreciate the enthusiasm some users have for adding this picture to the page, but I'm going to have to resist sharing it. As I've said elsewhere adding pictures without context is not creating content. The Bourse is not mentioned in the text, I have no idea where it fits into the development of Greek revival, nor would any other reader. To my eye the diocletian window and peristyle make it an atypical example of the style, just how influencial was it? Again our anonymous grangerizer doesn't tell us. A new section on the Baltic Greek revival would be most welcome, if it included information on Finland, Lithuania, Poland and Denmark as well as Russia and placed each in the wider historical development. Then perhaps you might like to illustrate that. Twospoonfuls 11:44, 1 March 2007 (UTC)

I'm starting to feel like I'm victimizing this poor fellow, but I really can't make my mind up if the latest effort is tantamount to vandalism or just pitifully inept. The Russian boosterism is touching but central Petersburg is largely Naryshkin Baroque and Rastrelliesque, the author really needs to be a lot more specific and detailed. So I'm going to post it here and invite anyone to amend it before it is reinserted. Twospoonfuls 12:55, 4 March 2007 (UTC)

Greek revival in Russia[edit]

The historical center of Saint Petersburg was rebuilt by Alexander I of Russia, and so the Greek revival had a debut in Russia. On the Strelka of the Vasilievsky Island the Saint Petersburg Bourse was built, a forty four Doric columns temple. Leo von Klenze expanded the Hermitage Museum and made an other example of this style.

Greek revival in X[edit]

I was afraid of this. This article is in danger of degenerating into an unencyclopedic list of Greek-revival-buildings-I-have-heard-of like the example above or the section on Canada. Perhaps we need to thresh out the minimum criteria for inclusion in the article, which ought to include some mention of an architect or work's importance within the historical development of the style. It simply isn't good enough to add pictures or text without indicating how their subject stands within the larger context of the topic as a whole. Twospoonfuls (talk) 18:55, 11 January 2008 (UTC)

There's a lengthy section of the US so I didn't think a few Canada examples would be controversial. The two buildings I added are fairly prominent examples, along with a link to the Ostell article contextualizing his role up here. Shawn in Montreal (talk) 05:34, 12 January 2008 (UTC)
I think the Ostell reference is notable because he apparently did a lot of prominent Greek Revival public buildings. But if you feel this is all just an add-on, please just delete. I think I see what you're trying for here, i.e., something more synthesized than some of the other architecture articles, which do degenerate into mere lists. As you wish, Shawn in Montreal (talk) 06:02, 12 January 2008 (UTC)

P.S. I threw in an article on the author of St. Pete Exchange, Jean-François Thomas de Thomon. There's hardly a trace of Greek Revival in any of his works - it's an old-school, academic French neoclassicism of ancien regime. NVO (talk) 05:15, 14 October 2009 (UTC)

Drawing the line[edit]

Is it possible to draw the line between neoclassicism and Greek Revival, and the line Greek Revival and Neo-Grek ? just curious. The difference between Empire neoclassicism and Neo-Grek is evident even to an untrained eye (perhaps it's my personal misconception shaped by living in a culture that happily missed Greek Revival wave), but throw in "Greek Revival" and it all blurs together... NVO (talk) 05:11, 14 October 2009 (UTC)

Correctly captioned?[edit]

I'm wondering if the date given for Thomas Hamilton's design for The Royal High School (1831) is correct, given that the building was erected between 1824 and 1829? Kim Traynor | Talk 20:03, 26 May 2014 (UTC)