Talk:Grid plan

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I've added some information about Austin, Texas as an example. I'm slowly developing this article, and expect to add a lot more history in the near future, thus the wording should remain fairly rough.-- Decumanus 06:28, 26 Jan 2004 (UTC)

Another strong example is Salt Lake City-- the entire valley was mapped and grided (on paper) before the city started. Another point-- the Chinese layed out their cities on grids as well. Do you know about this? I can do some research...Davejenk1ns 06:54, 30 Sep 2004 (UTC)

The city of Suzhou in China was layed out as a complicated grid, back in 1229. [Engraved Map|http://www.sacu.org/pic28.html] August B. 09:14, 4 April 2007 (UTC)

Washington, D.C.[edit]

Washington, D.C. is a poor example of a grid plan as it has a "hub and spoke" pattern superimposed on the grid pattern, which results in odd, six-way roundabouts like Dupont Circle. The "avenues" are part of the spoke system, whereas the lettered (i.e., "Eye" Street, K Street, L Street) and numbered (Ninth Street, Sixteenth Street, etc.) form the grid. The pattern is also broken up by geographic features such as the Anacostia River and the valley comprising Rock Creek Park. Rlquall 14:47, 1 September 2006 (UTC)


Pros and Cons[edit]

Can anybody add a section about the pros and cons of a grid street pattern? I feel that it is relevant in the urban and land use stand point, especially in contrast with street hierarchy plans and others. I would do it but I'm not quite as knowlegeable in the subject. perhapsd I'll start out with a draft.--Chicbicyclist 08:28, 3 September 2006 (UTC)

Deadlock[edit]

Hm, there is an article at wikipedia about a deadlock situation sometimes happening during rush hours with grid plans. Can't tell the name of this article anymore, maybe someone knows which one I mean? --Abdull 03:23, 1 October 2006 (UTC)

Found it, it's called Gridlock, but I can't say if this exclusively applies to grid plans. --Abdull 03:33, 1 October 2006 (UTC)

Added to the Pros and Cons[edit]

A short paragraph about development of grid-plan-abiding cities. Not very detailed though, just a short "dépannage". --El Belga 15:01, 9 October 2006 (UTC) The pedestrian benefits need to be sourced and it should also note the hinderence the Grid system imposes on pedestrians with having to cross a road with traffic from 4 directions every block.(86.31.184.151 (talk) 02:11, 30 December 2008 (UTC))

SimCity?[edit]

I don't think it's good to add, but is mentioning SimCity relevant to this article? It does give some idea of advantages for the grid planning and also its disadvantages. --Revth 08:16, 20 October 2006 (UTC)

A link from Simcity would be good, but a link to Simcity? I don't see how that is relevant to this article. Simcity's grid plan has to do with the limitation of the game's engine more than anything else.--Chicbicyclist 09:58, 20 October 2006 (UTC)

Comparison of American Grids Picture[edit]

Can anyone explain what that means and why it is there? I understood nothing by looking at that image. what is it comparing? How? What locations? It is not representative of the city as a whole either. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 98.110.157.107 (talk) 21:01, 13 January 2013 (UTC)

Asia from the first millennium AD[edit]

Although some Wikipedia authors and editors still do not see the point of taking a neutral attitude with regard to dates, such as by using CE (common era) and BCE (before the common era), and although Wikipedia official policy appears to be to take no stand on the matter, I hope most would agree with my observation that, at least in a section of this article about the use of the grid plan in Asia in the first millennium of the common era, it is in poor taste, probably insulting to some, and, therefore, unwise to use dates prefaced with "AD" (defined at http://www.merriam-webster.com/ as: "Medieval Latin, in the year of the Lord" [Jesus Christ]) in sentences such as: "The ancient capitals of Japan, such as Fujiwara-Kyô (AD 694-710), Nara (Heijô-Kyô, AD 710-784), and Kyoto (Heian-Kyô, AD 794-1868)...."

There are at least two alternatives to using "AD": use the initials CE (common era) or use naked dates. For example, instead of "AD 694-710," one could write "694-710 CE" or merely "694-710." The latter, in fact, is the style used in the rest of the article following this section. Wikifan2744 (talk) 19:24, 20 April 2014 (UTC)