Talk:Gunnera

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As you can see from the picture in the article, the unusual leaves of this plant are shaped remarkably like a man with a blue shirt, with his arm forming the stem.

Very amusing. I am that man. I do not normally carry a gigantic ruler to show the scale of things so I used myself instead. OK? Sorry about the silly grin, I blame my wife for taking the picture at the wrong moment - Adrian Pingstone 18:11, 27 Jan 2005 (UTC)
Haha, yes it's ok. I just couldn't resist the joke. It's really nice. --DanielCD 13:35, 28 Jan 2005 (UTC)
The botanical standard is to use one's hat, while for geologists it's the rock hammer, or ice axe if at higher altitudes. Some entomologists use a shoe bottom. :-) Stan 18:02, 28 Jan 2005 (UTC)
I don't wear a hat! (and no hat was available from those around me) - Adrian Pingstone 21:50, 28 Jan 2005 (UTC)

So there is some of this Gunnera growing near where I live in Bellingham, WA USA —Preceding unsigned comment added by Fsprinkle (talkcontribs) 18:39, 13 September 2007 (UTC)

I changed "unique among higher plants" to "unique among flowering plants", as higher could mean anything from vascular plants to angiosperms. http://books.google.com/books?id=ACmtKqcWV5IC&pg=PA66&lpg=PA66&dq=cyanobacteria+vascular+plant+symbiosis&source=bl&ots=12nFARmj6Z&sig=lrBTGIAkco2ZgidRBGl8DB2WVK4&hl=en&ei=WPhiTZyfBMnLgQfR6fm-Ag&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBkQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false indicates that similar symbioses are also found among cycads (hence my choice of angiosperms). — Preceding unsigned comment added by Gould363 (talkcontribs) 23:59, 21 February 2011 (UTC)