Talk:HIV/AIDS in Uganda

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WikiProject class rating[edit]

This article was automatically assessed because at least one WikiProject had rated the article as start, and the rating on other projects was brought up to start class. BetacommandBot 16:27, 10 November 2007 (UTC)

The central finding of the Rakai study was that, due to Uganda's focus on prevention of the spread of HIV-AIDS, rather than treatment for those who had already contracted the disease, a large part of the decline in prevalence of HIV-AIDS is due to death of those who have contracted it. This lead to the popular play on the ABC campaign, 'A-B-C-D', with the D standing for Death. Because only prevalence is measured, incidence can actually increase while prevalence decreases if those who contract HIV are not treated for the disease, thereby dying younger. Later studies have seriously questioned the veracity of Uganda's miraculous HIV-AIDS claims.

There is very little treatment in the form of anti-retrovirals for those who are HIV positive. The country's HIV-AIDS campaign focuses solely on prevention rather than cure, and that prevention is of questionable success.

Some critics have argued that Uganda's success story has been hugely exaggerated as a combatant to donor fatigue, and to bolster the US Republican case for Abstinence only campaigns in Africa.

The above comment is unsigned and unreferenced. "Some critics have argued" is weasel-wording.--Hugh7 (talk) 22:07, 12 April 2012 (UTC)

condoms=/=contraception[edit]

The C in ABC stands for Condoms, not Contraception. Preventing conception has nothing to do with preventing HIV. I have changed it.--Hugh7 (talk) 22:07, 12 April 2012 (UTC)