Talk:Hadza language

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Untitled[edit]

Are you really sure that the Hadza mtDNA is so divergent? The Hadza mtDNA lineage is L2, i.e. a Pygmy lineage. The statement that Hadza make up one of the oldest human groups is misleading. Genetically they are related to Pygmies. So, more strictly speaking, the lineage of the Pygmies and Hadza was the second one that separated from the human DNA tree. 82.100.61.114 14:47, 23 March 2007 (UTC)

Can you back this up? kwami
It's mostly L4 (also found in the Sandawe), but with L2, L0 and L3 mixed in and mostly Y-chromosome B, but with presumably later admixture of E. So divergent a bit, but related to Pygmies and East Africans, closest to the Sandawe. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.152.221.121 (talk) 09:53, 3 January 2010 (UTC)

sounds[edit]

The bilabial click seems to be modally nasal & labialized, rather than glottalized, perhaps an influence of mimesis, but then all labials are allophonically labialized. There's also an epiglottal fricative. But both phonemes are marginal, occuring in only a single known word each, each of which may occur with another phoneme instead (much like pʼ). Not published, though, so can't put in article. kwami 08:38, 13 May 2007 (UTC)

I just took another look at the Sands et al. paper, and they say the aspirated and tenuis clicks don't contrast. Can anyone confirm or refute that? Should they be taken out? WmGB (talk) 20:41, 20 June 2008 (UTC)

That appears to be something they missed. Tucker & Bryan say they do; they collaborated with Woodburn, who (along with his daughter) are apparently the only non-locals who speak Hadza. (Same for frics.) There should be more stuff coming out later this year that we can cite. I plan on updating the article once that's out. kwami (talk) 22:20, 20 June 2008 (UTC)

What is "Hadzabe"?[edit]

There shouldn't be two links, but maybe it would be helpful to indicate somehow to readers that the Hadzabe are the Hadza people? Please make the change or let me know you won't revert it if I do so. Thanks. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Kjaer (talkcontribs) 08:00, 10 November 2008 (UTC)