Talk:Haemophilus influenzae

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http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/316/7144/0/c?gca=bmj%3B316%2F7144%2F0%2Fc&gca=bmj%3B316%2F7144%2F1571&gca=bmj%3B316%2F7144%2F0%2Fd&gca=bmj%3B316%2F7144%2F1570&gca=bmj%3B316%2F7146%2F1745&gca=bmj%3B316%2F7147%2F1824&


I wish people would start putting antibiotic sensitivities on the micro-organism pages. it would make treatment a hell of a lot easier. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 129.215.37.73 (talk) 21:16, 13 March 2008 (UTC)


gives it as first identified in 1883, as a pathogen, by RObert Koch, of the postulate, citing http://adc.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/86/6/396#R1

Doxycycline[edit]

In the Wikipedia entry for Doxycycline it is stated that it's used for treatment of H. Influenzae infections (e.g. pneumonia), but this article here doesn't mention Doxycycline at all. I am not a physician so I don't dare to edit this article, but it is obvious that it's at odds with the Wikipedia entry on Doxycycline. 213.243.137.56 (talk) 08:10, 22 June 2009 (UTC)



this article deserves its own section on the vaccine[edit]

yes, it does. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 207.151.239.82 (talk) 05:31, 6 April 2007 (UTC).


Serotypes[edit]

The article suggests that unencapsulated H. influenzae is simply any H. influenza without a b serotype--that is, serotypes a, c, d, e and f (see second paragraph under "Diseases"). However, my understanding was that the serotype was due to the specific polysaccharide capsule of the bacteria, and that unencapsulated H. influenzae was categorized seperately as "nontypeable." Please clarify. Thewookie55 22:47, 8 October 2007 (UTC)

intro could be changed - common flu[edit]

another claim to why they thought it was the cause of the common flu was because it was common to get a secondary infection of H. influ after the primary infection of the viral interstitial pneumonitis (pneumonia). Tkjazzer 01:54, 12 November 2007 (UTC)

Symptoms?[edit]

Odd they aren't discussed in the article. LeadSongDog come howl! 18:03, 17 March 2011 (UTC)

Incidence[edit]

With the vaccine, "the incidence of invasive Hib disease has decreased to 1.3/100,000 in children". What was it beforehand? MartinezMD (talk) 02:24, 18 July 2011 (UTC)

Naming[edit]

Not in wikipedia's domain, but, why are we calling something that isnt flu influenzae?

Haemophilus is still called influenza because of the flu-like symptoms and pneumonia it causes. Haemophilus can also cause a form of bacterial meningitis. Malke 2010 (talk) 17:44, 7 April 2013 (UTC)

The organism was first isolated in during the 1890s influenza outbreak, and was initially thought to be the cause of influenza. In reality, it was causing bacterial pneumonia secondary to viral influenza, but the name stuck. [1] — Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.168.167.62 (talk) 16:13, 18 November 2013 (UTC)

Photograph[edit]

The photo of H. influenzae on blood agar is almost certainly not Haemophilus. H. influenzae does not grow on Sheep Blood Agar due to its requirement for Hemin and NAD. It is possible that the photo is showing an agar with Horse Blood (although I still think the colonies pictured are too large and dark in color to be believable). If so, this should be specified, because microbiologists typically use "Blood Agar" as shorthand for 5% Sheep Blood Agar. It would be more accurate to have a picture of H. influenzae on Chocolate Agar.

68.168.167.62 (talk) 16:09, 18 November 2013 (UTC)

  1. ^ http://textbookofbacteriology.net/haemophilus.html