Talk:Hajime Sorayama

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Biography (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Biography, a collaborative effort to create, develop and organize Wikipedia's articles about people. All interested editors are invited to join the project and contribute to the discussion. For instructions on how to use this banner, please refer to the documentation.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 
Note icon
This article has been automatically rated by a bot or other tool because one or more other projects use this class. Please ensure the assessment is correct before removing the |auto= parameter.
WikiProject Sexuality (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Sexuality, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of human sexuality on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Japan / Biography  (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of the WikiProject Japan, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Japan-related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the project and see a list of open tasks. Current time in Japan: 16:11, July 10, 2014 (JST, Heisei 26) (Refresh)
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the Biography task force.
 
WikiProject Science Fiction  
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Science Fiction, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of science fiction on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Visual arts  
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Visual arts, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of visual arts on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the quality scale.
 

Untitled[edit]

Why are "anime" and "manga" mentioned in comparison? They don't seem to have anything to do with the subject. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Theodore Kloba (talkcontribs)

Article neutrality[edit]

There's a number of neutrality issues in this article, such as:

"He does ASFR drawings of female pin ups and erotic art that are super realistic and also draws robot women, cyborgs and other illustrations of humans and animals."

Unless "super realism" is an art form, this should be reworded to be more neutral, as the realism can be debated and is not a judgement for Wikipedia to make.
...well, I'd like to reply by pointing out that the phrase 'super realism' has, in fact been coined to refer to this form of art...the subject matter, although of course subject to artistic vision, is presented in a form so detailed and authentic as to defy one's eyes to recognize it as a work of art, rather than a representation of that which exists...some would consider it 'photorealistic' and that isn't a stretch, when the subject could have been posed so...but when the subject doesn't exist, and is created of imagination, to create a representation on paper of such accuracy and realism goes beyond what can be real to 'super real'.

"... while simultaneously raising the level of skill and craftsmanship in the field to new heights."

So he has affected the craftmanship in this field in general? Then this claim would definitely need a source.
...you simultaneously exaggerate and minimize, sir...of course no one man can simultaneously increase the talents of those around him in any field...but he can raise the bar, and show them a higher level to which to aspire...and by so doing, they may very well improve.

"He is also described as one of the most significant erotic artists of the 20th century."

This bold statement is unfortunately currently unsourced.

"The pinup art of Sorayama is delicious and erotic, blending the soft contours of the female form with the industrialized shiny metal "skin" of the humanoid "android" that is bound to both arouse and shock the viewer. Sorayama's "real women" pinups are sexy, intriguing, and seem "real to the touch". The robots, and combinations of the two, are shiny, glistening, and sleekly attractive."

According to whom, exactly? The article should not make judgements about deliciousness, sexiness, reality and attractiveness at least. Although I can personally see the artistic skill in these pictures, people do have different views on attraction in art.
...regardless of your personal viewpoint on Sorayama's work, the skill with which it is produced is beyond reproach...this man has a remarkable talent for illustration, and he chooses to ilustrate that which fascinates him...if you find depictions of nudes to be unattractive, or the idea of cybernetics disturbing, or fetish/bondage repulsive, I would suggest that you're viewing the wrong artist to suit your tastes...this is not meant in any pejorative sense, it's merely an observation that you seem to attack the simple praise that is given to the artist, for no other reason than that You personally find his work unattractive...in this respect, you are offering your opinion to a forum that is primarily comprised of fans of the artist...rather similar to rolling a stone up a hill, you will achieve very little in the attempt...we know what we like, and whether or not you agree is of no concern whatsoever.
Spyder — Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.196.142.8 (talk) 12:01, November 18, 2006

-- Northgrove 08:53, 10 October 2006 (UTC)

....To reply to certain concerns above. I do not know how the term "super realism" got in here; it may be better termed "hyper illustration" as is often used by collectors and critics. There are numerous reference and a google search of "Hajime Sorayama" will show how highly regarded his talents are. Beyond that Sorayama has many peer artists, museuems, fashion designers and media people who vaunt his skill and art. For example, artist Ron English is quoted as describing Sorayama as a combination of Dali and Norman Rockwell. Bob Guccione of Penthouse fame, and himself a talented artist, included Sorayama works for over 9 years in monthly editions of Penthouse from about 1995 to 2004. Mr. Guccione states that Sorayama's art form redoubles his belief that sexuality can be depicted as a high art form. Mr. Hefner's Playboy TV did a Sorayama special on their series Sexcetera in 2005 that included an interview with his longtime representative Ms. Yamamoto. Many peer pin up artists have gone to the trouble to discuss Sorayama on their websites so those descriptions are out there to help in this regard. Sorayama received the highest design award that may be conferred by Japan on a project involving technology and his art. Nike awarded Sorayama top honors in a recent design competition. Disney used Sorayama to design "Future Mickey" and there are many others who seek out his art or collaboration. MOMA and the Smithsonian Institute Museum both have Sorayama art in their permanent collections. WEAM museum held its first erotic art show with Sorayama art in 2008 and in 2009 ongoing Opera Gallery has chosen to display his arts internationally. Bubwater (talk) 15:19, 6 January 2010 (UTC)

Vargas vs. Vargas[edit]

"Sorayama is also often described as an imaginative modern day Vargas."

Vargas Links to Vargas (Comics) . I think the link should be to Alberto Vargas

Rich Mielke 14:05, 11 October 2006 (UTC)

Merge with Sexy robot[edit]

Sexy robot should simply be merged into this article. Hajime Sorayama is the person known for that phrase. --George100 09:42, 5 April 2007 (UTC)

Perhaps it should be split apart again. Robert Abel and Associates created an award winning computer animated commercial in 1985 for the American Can Council featuring a "sexy robot". I don't know if Sorayama was involved in the design or if he was just ripped off. But it provided a substantial exposure for the concept. K8 fan (talk) 05:30, 9 October 2008 (UTC)
Sub-pages are fine with some short references here. Bubwater (talk) 15:24, 6 January 2010 (UTC)
If ever there was an article called Sexy robot, it passed into oblivion thanks to the bright-minded editor who replaced it with a redirect to this article, destroying it, so any talk about "merging" them is meaningless. In this discussion there is no indication whatsoever if the merge was done or not (it was, though it is not obvious. The result was lossy: I am in agreement with K8 fan: Sexy robot should better be split apart again. --SciCorrector (talk) 22:19, 25 March 2010 (UTC)

Tautology[edit]

Humanoid "android" is needlessly repetitive.Sochwa 18:59, 5 August 2007 (UTC)

Legal issues concerning Sorayama[edit]

Note: The following unsourced, dubiously-sourced, and copied or pirated text scattered within the body of the article was hampering it. I have moved it here for further elaboration / discussion. --SciCorrector (talk) 22:54, 25 March 2010 (UTC) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Within the Notable Works are a sub-category of 33 or potentially 84 Sorayama originals / master images that are embezzled and or pirated arts that public may assist to recover for reward on case by case basis. The public may be able to help find some of these images for a reward that www.sorayama.net will email terms on a case by case basis. Some of the pieces of interest at this time are as follows:
1. Embezzled / defrauded Image No. HS94 Contact www.sorayama.net for details.

2. Embezzled / defrauded Images No. 2001.16 embezzled original was recovered about Jan. 2010 and documented that the pirated aspect still exists in potential counterfeiting including ongoing contempt issues of the federal court system. It is wasting tax payer dollars while accelerating frauds during the court sessions; Image No. 2001.21 is an embezzled and pirated piece that is still open to recovery should someone come across it. [1]

3. Any Sorayama pieces designated WP or Working Proof that come with a Certificate of Authenticity from a gallery or publisher that have sold such pieces on line and or by mail that is documented in an acceptable format--contact for details with your details about the piece.

4. Any Sorayama piece with a Certificate of Authenticity (CoA) from a Bane gallery or Bane publisher where the CoA is dated and signed between 2007 and 2010 time frame.

...

H

In 2007, Japanese artist Hajime Sorayama obtained a nearly $2-million judgment (????), including $1 million in punitive damages, against Robert S. Bane, his publishing company, Robert Bane Ltd., and his gallery, the Tamara Bane Gallery. In 2009, a federal bankruptcy court refused to allow Bane to discharge the debt, citing a pattern of intentional and pervasive fraud perpetrated against Sorayama. BREAKING NEWS: 15 January 2010 Bankruptcy Appellate Panel rulings is concluded concerning trial court and bankruptcy court rulings against debtor. The trial court Judge Florence Marie Cooper and subsequent bankruptcy court rulings stand in place under the review and scrutiny of higher courts (citing United States Bankruptcy Appellate Panel of the 9th Circuit: BAP No. CC-09-1108-MoPaH).[2]

In The Venture Bros. episode "Past Tense," a character named Mike Sorayama builds robots nearly identical to those depicted by Hajime. Sorayama is thanked in the episode's credits. In the South Park Series a short scene contains the world famous sexy robotic image. Star Trek series used Sorayama to design the female borg Romulan. He did art for the T3 Terminator movie/T3 Comics, Spawn 1997 and is now working on a new movie project. Perhaps, most famous is not a female form but the first generation of Sony AIBO robotic pets (first of their kind) which received the highest Japanese government award. Sorayama's art is in the permanent collections of MOMA and the Smithsonian Institution.[1]

The late 1990s to present day 2010 are a busy period for Sorayama. In addition to books, limited edition lithographic prints and giclees being published, Sorayama's futuristic and Shunga-style work was serialized monthly in Bob Guccione's Penthouse magazine and graced the pages of Playboy and other magazines. He consulted as a conceptual artist for the films, Brain Dead (movie) (1992), Time Cop (1994), Spawn (movie) (1997), Night Watch (movie) (1997), and the HBO TV series, Perversions of Science (1997). In 1995, he designed a mechanical warrior for the science-fiction B-movie, Space Trucker. His renderings of the female form appear on Aerosmith's album "Just Press Play" and has been engaged to do art for female T3 Terminator as well as the Star Trek series borgified female forms. Southpark, the animated show, has used Sorayama art in one of their episodes.

In the late 1990's, Sorayama was approached by the Sony Corporation to design an organic robotic form. It became the famous "AIBO" dog, the first [artificial intelligence] pet[1], which received Japan's highest design award and was acquired by the Museum of Modern Art.[2] and the Smithsonian Institution for their permanent collections. All this occurring at the turn of the century as Sorayama's art grew in popularity.

In 2005, Playboy Sexcetra made a TV special about Sorayama including an interview with his longtime agent Ms. Yamamoto. During 2002 to 2008 Sorayama had many well attended art shows at different venues; One Man Show at Gallery GGG, Tokyo and Osaka/Japan,Group Exhibitions at Ginza Recruit Gallery in Tokyo, a USA venue one was at the international Opera Gallery NYC location and the other at WEAM in South Beach, Florida. In 2009, Sorayama was one of 25 Japanese artists to be commissed by Nike to create a tribute to the company's White Dunk. An interview with Sorayama can be seen at www.whitedunk.com

Sorayama's most extensive publishing project, a new book, is planned for release in late spring 2010.
Cite error: There are <ref> tags on this page, but the references will not show without a {{reflist}} template (see the help page).