Talk:Handedness

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Shared material with left-handed[edit]

Moved to Talk:Laterality#From Talk:Handedness.23Shared material with left-handed. Please go there to continue merger discussion.
The removed material spans 10:25, 25 Jan 2005 to 03:12, 11 February 2006, and was moved from here at 10:27, 11 March 2006.

Proposed merger [edit]

Moved to Talk:Laterality#Merger proposal. Please go there to continue merger discussion.
The removed material spans 02:55, 11 February 2006 to 10:16, 11 March 2006, and was moved from here at 2006-03-11 10:27:30

/* Genetic factors */ deletion due to failed verification[edit]

This statement does not correlate with the citations provided.

"Other mechanisms may play a role in handedness, for example hormone signalling. Medland et al.[21] found a CAG repeat length variant in the androgen receptor gene (AR) that is positively correlated with left-handedness in females, and negatively correlated in males. This same variant is positively correlated with testosterone levels in males, and negatively correlated in females." This may help to explain why there are more left-handed men than women (around 12% in men versus 10% in women globally).[3] However, another study has found that this variant is instead associated with mixed-handedness in males (and not left-handedness), conflicting with the original results.[22]

One citation provided is a meta-study, that doesn't give explanation on why "left handedness" is more prevalent in males, just that it is more prevalent in males, the other citation provided states the exact opposite of the above text:

Behav Genet. 2005 Nov;35(6):735-44. Opposite effects of androgen receptor CAG repeat length on increased risk of left-handedness in males and females.

"Likelihood of left handedness increased in those individuals with variants of the androgen receptor associated with lower testosterone levels"

the heart position could be the main reason humans are right handed predominantly.?[edit]

the heart position, in the chest, could be the main reason that humans are mostly right handed, i.e. the heart position, in the chest, causes humans to be right handed.? (Gmlcys (talk) 04:03, 29 March 2014 (UTC))Gmlcys (talk) 03:07, 31 March 2014 (UTC)

Dubious: "Ambilevous or ambisinister"[edit]

The article asserts,

Ambilevous or ambisinister people demonstrate awkwardness with both hands. Ambisinistrous motor skills or a low level of dexterity may be the result of a debilitating physical condition.

I have tagged this sentence dubious because it cites no authority and I think it's baloney. If "ambisinistrous" or "ambilevous" is a recognized classification within handedness, let's see some learned articles on it. Handedness is not a matter of disability because of injury or disease. The right-handed person who loses his right hand in an accident does not thereby become left-handed, even if he learns to use his left hand for all purposes. No more does the left-handed victim of, say, muiltiple sclerosis, who loses dexterity in both her hands, cease being left-handed and become "ambisinistrous". Those terms may be used by the medical profession to describe individual patients, but I strongly doubt that they represent developmental categories comparable to "left-handed" and "right-handed". J. D. Crutchfield | Talk 18:05, 31 March 2014 (UTC)