Talk:Hayy ibn Yaqdhan

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WikiProject class rating[edit]

This article was automatically assessed because at least one WikiProject had rated the article as stub, and the rating on other projects was brought up to Stub class. BetacommandBot 04:05, 10 November 2007 (UTC)

copy[edit]

With the exception of some fragments of poetry, his only extant work is Hayy Ibn Yaqzan (The Living Son of the Vigilant). The title and names of characters of this work are borrowed from two of Ibn Sina's philosophical treatises, Hayy Ibn Yaqzan and Salaman and Absal, and its framework is borrowed from an ancient eastern tale, The Story of the Idol and of the King and His Daughter. The title is taken from the name of the main character, Hayy Ibn Yaqzan. In the introduction and conclusion, the author addresses the reader directly; in other parts of the work, he uses a 'thin veil', a symbolic form, a story to express his philosophical views.

I took this from here; http://www.muslimphilosophy.com/ip/rep/H030.htm#H030WKENT1
J8079s (talk) 05:26, 13 August 2009 (UTC)

Stub and rework[edit]

For background information, please see RFC/U and Cleanup. With 231 edits, User:Jagged 85 is the main contributor to this article by far (2nd: 8 edits). The issues are a repeat of what had been exemplarily shown here, here, here or here. Since the youngest pre-Jagged85 version (08 December 2007) is unreferenced, I stub the article. Gun Powder Ma (talk) 20:28, 16 April 2011 (UTC)

Did you bother checking any of the sources? They all check out in his original edit of this page. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 110.38.203.219 (talk) 16:32, 21 April 2012 (UTC)

Questionable broad claims of influence[edit]

This article is interesting and provocative, but many of the claims about influence across European literature are unsubstantiated. Specifically the claim about Rousseau and Kipling is given no credible (or live-linked) source. Just because there is some general similarity between two texts it does not demonstrate dependence or influence. In order to claim that these two works were "likely influenced" by Hayy ibn Yaqdhan one would want to see specific concrete evidence that Rousseau, e.g., read or knew the work. Without such evidence, these are just grand but overreaching speculations. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.141.83.253 (talk) 20:58, 20 November 2012 (UTC)

This is essentially like asking for proof that someone living right now ever saw the movie 'Godfather' or maybe even Disney's 'Lion King' (trying to think of popular films). Yes, there are plenty who haven't seen it, but this novel was probably the most popular foreign work in Europe for quite some time. It isn't an overreaching speculation at all. There would be few, IF ANY, authors in Western Europe at the time who would not have been aware of this work. Hell, the book and film "Life of Pi" is a thinly veiled tribute to it, all the major ingredients are there but that's been turned into a more psychology-focused story rather than philosophy. Edit: Oh and "many of the claims"? The bit about Rousseau and Kipling is like a brief half a sentence, the rest of it is well sourced, you can even use Google Books to read through some of the other sources and it turns out the emphasis isn't even as big as it should be regarding his influence over philosophers like Locke. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 116.71.12.14 (talk) 19:17, 25 November 2012 (UTC)

Molyneux problem[edit]

Can anyone find the corresponding Arabic text from Hayy ibn Yaqdhan where he mentions the story which is similar to the Molyneux problem? The full Arabic text should be here but I still cant find the "imagine a person born blind" line? --الدبوني (talk) 11:42, 18 December 2014 (UTC)