Talk:Heliospheric current sheet

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Bashful ballerina[edit]

Rhat is probably one of the stupidest analogies i have ever heard. have these people ever seen a ballet? do they know anything about ballet? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.3.108.140 (talk) 13:04, 16 September 2008 (UTC)

I really dont get why they call it a ballerina's skirt: see the examples at Ballet_tutu and at https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Costume_de_ballet . I think a flamenco dancer's dress (when in motion), is much closer to the idea: Flamenco and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijRrDHeAcTg Phantom in ca (talk) 09:54, 28 September 2012 (UTC)

I guess it's what plasma physicists imagine a ballerina's skirt to look like. One has spiral flutes, the other radial flutes. --Iantresman (talk) 19:36, 9 November 2012 (UTC)

Merge with heliosphere[edit]

I and a few other editors are attempting to gather together the scattered articles dealing with the heliosphere into one big article that takes on the topic whole. The current sheet is an important part of the heliosphere's structure and it seems logical that it be merged. Serendipodous 18:22, 25 May 2007 (UTC)

I think that the Heliospheric current sheet is a sufficiently distinct structure, with enough detailed information, that supports an article of its own. I also think that an separate article gives scope for expansion, and I doubt whether you'd want to include all of it in an article on the heliosphere. --84.9.191.165 21:33, 25 May 2007 (UTC)

I agree that the Heliospheric Current Sheet should remain separate. However, the issue could probably be resolved by adding a "short section" to the Heliosphere article briefly summarizing the current sheet article, and with a link "main article here" pointing toward the HCS article from the subsection of the heliosphere article. I think that's how many other "conglomerate" articles like "the sun" do it. Might be a workable solution, yeah? Mgmirkin 17:23, 12 July 2007 (UTC)

I appologize, I now see the sun in the middle and some eliptical lines around it, but I still would like to know if it is an actual photograph or not. If it is, is this sheet only visable with a certain - well, not sure what to call it.Mylittlezach (talk) 20:36, 29 August 2011 (UTC)

Pardon my ignorance, I was wondering if the 'photo' of the heliospheric current sheet is an actual photo of it or is it a representation of the sheet?? If it is a real photograph, where would the sun actually be within this sheet?? I appologize if it is in the article and that I missed it.Mylittlezach (talk) 20:33, 29 August 2011 (UTC)

Largest structure[edit]

The Heliospheric current sheet is described by a number of sources as the largest structure in the heliosphere. Unless you have some sources that say otherwise, this is not ambiguous. If you have a problem with the wording, then by all means clarify it, but leave the meaning. --Iantresman 00:28, 29 May 2007 (UTC)

The magnetosphere of the sun is larger than the heliosphere by virtue of pure dimensional analysis and a thickness argument. No citation necessary, just common sense. There are also plenty of other structures that can be pointed to which dominate the entire extent of the heliosphere. Again, no citation necessary. --ScienceApologist 04:07, 29 May 2007 (UTC)
Okay so point to them with a simple citation. I'm sure there's plenty of literature from reliable sources, yes? Likewise, if Heliospheric Current Sheet is referred to as the "largest structure" let's cite that too. Or it could be re-worded to something like "The Heliospheric Current Sheet is one of the largest structures in the heliosphere, including the IMF, and X, Y, Z..." That should satisfy all, yes? Opinion and "common sense" are nice and all. But "common sense," isn't so common to everyone. So, citations wouldn't hurt on either side of the issue. Mgmirkin 17:27, 12 July 2007 (UTC)

Heliospheric Current value[edit]

It is stated that the current is 5 microTeslas; shouldn't that be 5 nanoT? Chrystomath (talk) 11:36, 20 November 2010 (UTC)

There's a reference to the magnetic field which mentions that the "magnetic field produced by this current is B ~ 5x10-6 T"[1] in the first paragraph of the "Magnetic field" section. --Iantresman (talk) 19:26, 9 November 2012 (UTC)

Current sheath changes due to solar polarity[edit]

68.188.203.251 (talk) 00:28, 20 November 2012 (UTC) I note the first reference is to NASA A Star with two North Poles in reference to SC 23 in which there was a period where the two hemispheres of the sun were not in sync and there were two North magnetic poles on the sun. I feel this article had a lot more info to offer. Particularly since the North pole of the sun abrogated 2011 sydneyobservatory.com.au/2011/harry-reports-on-the-latest-exciting-development-on-the-sun-the-disappearance-of-the-magnetic-hole-at-its-north-pole/ Material from LockheedMartin Solar and Astrophysics Lab which has a real time solar page. The material from NASA says the two NP changed the shape of the current sheath to one of a 'conch shell.' That implies there is a change with the sun having two SP. http://lmsal.com/solarsoft/latest_events/ In reading the Nasa 'two NP' I also am confused as to the 'normal' shape of the sheath. A ballerina tutu is a frill of up and down so how it "waviness increased." is beyond me. And the accompanying picture actually shows the sheath nearly flat. Since the cosmic rays flow alongside the sheath, a flatter one means less exposure and the 'shell' a continual bath. Also the info as to the south pointing magnetic field tends to cancel E's own magnetic field has been reversed? Wonder if there is solar info as to past magnetic reversal that also had a delay in hemispheric action? Since we now have both SC 24 and SC 23 with this glitch.

Images don't match[edit]

The image at the top of the article (Heliospheric current sheet) shows a double spiral, having 2 'arms', but the second image (Parker spiral) shows a single spiral, and the article describes a Parker spiral as a form of Archimedean spiral, which only have 1 'arm'. So which image is correct? I suggest that the other be removed. nagualdesign (talk) 23:54, 29 November 2013 (UTC)