Talk:Hermunduri

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[Untitled][edit]

"The people in Thuringia still pronounce their land with a D instead of T(h)"

This softening pronounciation has nothing to do with the Hermunduri! The current (northern) Thurinigian dialect is an East Central German dialect which has its origin in the German west-to-east colonisation during the High Middle Ages and thus is related to Hessian dialect which itself belongs to the Franconian dialect group (Rhine Franconian).

Southern Thuringian dialects largely belong to the Upper German dialects, though, and in fact is East Franconian German.

Both Hessian and East Franconian tend to soften 'hard' consonants (t -> d, k -> g, p -> b).

--JFritsche (talk) 15:27, 4 April 2009 (UTC)