Talk:Hex editor

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Advertising[edit]

It looks like a young one recently added a "Beginner Hex Editor" field - An editor might want to remove it? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.160.156.129 (talk) 02:56, 22 April 2013 (UTC)

I reworked and reworded the section to keep the pertinent information and make it broader. I left the picture so far as it exemplifies a template system. Maybe the figures sub text should be edited too.

88.219.148.187 (talk) 15:50, 4 September 2013 (UTC)

More Information[edit]

Can somebody put in more information, such as what the different columns mean and/or how to use a hex editor? Thanks. -anon —Preceding unsigned comment added by 141.213.247.14 (talk) 00:28, 15 November 2007 (UTC) hoi — Preceding unsigned comment added by 217.123.3.47 (talk) 19:06, 26 January 2012 (UTC)

External Links[edit]

I love it when I can quickly find a program to download when I'm using Wikipedia... but this page has too many links! If we should keep any of them at all, then I suggest those that aren't open source (or at least freeware) to be removed. - Roma_emu 00:28, 11 March 2007 (UTC)

Whoever removed the links, shouldn't have. I got HxD from this page, now I had to go to history to get it. I am putting the links back. 14:32, 22 May 2007 (EDT)
Wikipedia is not a repository of links, it's an encyclopedia. See policy at WP:NOT#LINK. Rwxrwxrwx 09:56, 22 June 2007 (UTC)
If you must put in links, they should go in a list/comparison article explicitly for the purpose. Conversely, if you must do a mass deletion, copy the removed links to the correct article or to the comments with a notice not to add them again. If you just delete them, people (who probably should know better) will just readd them and you'll annoy the ones who are looking for them! It's best to put a short note such as a link to the other article and move them out of here. Yeah, this is an old issue - Wikipedia isn't tech support or Softpedia, but it's really nice to not have to search all over the Internet for the information and(especially free/open source) tools.71.196.246.113 (talk) 04:05, 9 February 2012 (UTC)

Large file viewing[edit]

Almost all modern text editors read the whole file into memory in order to work with it. This makes even just browsing/viewing large files awkward and slow -- sometimes impossible, if they do not fit into memory. So, a person wanting to view a large text file needs to use a hex editor, because some of them are able to browse through large files directly, without having to load the whole file into memory first. Some hex editors are probably better than others at displaying text nicely. See "Maximum file size" and "Partial file loading" columns in Comparison of hex editors. Are there any particularly good guides to "Viewing large text files"? -69.87.200.124 12:12, 17 August 2007 (UTC)

Just do what people with large log files do - break it up! It's really easy to write some oldschool program that does nothing but read a line in, increments a counter (line number or filesize), and then outputs the line to a second file. When it gets to a predefined limit, it closes the output file and creates another with an incremented name. If it runs out of lines to read, then it closes the last file and exits. QBASIC's syntax is highly optimized to this sort of program but in actual practice, it's better to use a C variation with a good (flexible/stable/easy-to-use/lightweight) text I/O library. Unicode support would be essential, nowadays. Stability includes resistance against buffer/parsing bug exploits. Even proprietary formats like Word or PDF could in theory be re-encoded as a series of smaller files. I've seen programs that break a PDF apart at the page boundery. 71.196.246.113 (talk) 04:14, 9 February 2012 (UTC)
This is not really true. I created a hex editor using my own programming language that only "reads" when needed and "writes" when needed. When designing your hex editor, you must make sure that your language supports random access file input and output. Yes, you can use a random access hex editor to modify gigabyte sized files, because it doesn't actually store any of the file into memory. It just stores small chunks of the file - the chunks that you are currently looking at or are editing. --Carrot Lord (talk) 01:39, 17 January 2013 (UTC)

Merge?[edit]

Should this article be merged with disk editor?--DustWolf (talk) 14:15, 31 August 2008 (UTC)

I don't think so. Perhaps the other way around if anything - a disk editor is more a special case of a hex editor, and hex editing files is more common than disk editing nowadays. But generally they each have their own requirements. This page probably needs expanding though, to explain how a hex editor is different to a disk editor for one thing. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 203.110.131.5 (talk) 03:13, 24 November 2008 (UTC)

Origin of name[edit]

"Each hexadecimal digit (also called a "nibble") represents four binary digits (bits), and the primary use of hexadecimal notation is as a human-friendly representation of binary-coded values in computing and digital electronics. For example, byte values can range from 0 to 255 (decimal) but may be more conveniently represented as two hexadecimal digits in the range 00 through FF. " - From the Hexadecimal article

It pretty much describes why almost all 'binary' file editors are in fact technically based on hexadecimal and not binary. I wonder where this term was first used? As in, when people shortened it from the full name. Another name for a hexadecimal digit is a nibble, by the way. (From Apple II/Commodore communities, mostly? There's even a magazine by that name.) 71.196.246.113 (talk) 04:21, 9 February 2012 (UTC)

In a related note, editing a raw image file can technically be binary if it has only 1 bitplane (say, a B/W image with no greys). 71.196.246.113 (talk) 04:28, 9 February 2012 (UTC)

Disturbing Image[edit]

The very first image disturbs me very much. The user is using a hex editor - yes a hexadecimal editor - to modify an HTML file. Why doesn't he just use a text editor such as Vim or gedit?

Shouldn't we display an example of a binary file being modified by a certain hex editor? --Carrot Lord (talk) 01:53, 17 January 2013 (UTC)