Talk:Hirth Acrostar

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Mk I ?[edit]

It is possible that the first prototype was the Mk I and Acrobats were Mk IIs from c/n 2 onward; bbu Jane's refers to c/n 1 as the prototye Mk II and does not mention Mk I at all. I could find no citatable mention of to a Mk.I. TSRL (talk) 07:56, 21 September 2010 (UTC)

Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft has Hirth Acrostar advanced competitive aerobatic aircraft prrtotype was flown first on 16 April 1970. The initial production Acrostar II was followed later by the improved Acrostar III. Other references all call the prototype a Mk. II some blogs suggest that Wagner modified a Kramme and Zeuthen KZ VIII as the Mark I - no proof. MilborneOne (talk) 10:17, 21 September 2010 (UTC)
The plans (but not the text) in the modellers article [1] do identify the prototype (see tailplane detail, for example) as the Mk 1. But they are drawn by the author and not, as far as I can see, sourced. Not citable, I'm sure. He may just have tidied up the story.TSRL (talk) 11:02, 21 September 2010 (UTC)

Akro with a K?[edit]

Err..I think it should be spelt with a 'k' folks i.e. 'Akrostar'. You might want to have another look at the Flight refs, linking to interesting stuff but nowt to do with this aircraft!! Cheers Nimbus (Cumulus nimbus floats by) 21:02, 29 September 2010 (UTC)

I've sorted the Flight links; thanks for that. Both names are used in the literature, and I did ponder. My main reason for going with Acrostar is that this is what Jane's uses. JAWA is pretty reliable, though errors do occur. However, as I understand it they get their data from the manufacturer, so the aircraft name is likely to be right. Flight's record is not clear but interesting: I found 4 refs to Akrostar and 4 to Acrostar. A score-draw, you might say, but the first 4 (with k) are all in the period 1970-2, and the Acrostars all in 1974-1982. Maybe they eventually decided this was the right way; it's also just possible the Akrostar form was taken up early on because of the correct spelling of the ubiquitous Zlin Akrobat. It is true that German writes Akrobat, but a proper German name for our chap would be Akrostern. I thought I had seen a note somewhere say the designer or builder preferred Acrostar, but since I can't find it for now that's not helpful. I rest my case chiefly on Jane's choice, which Simpson also uses.TSRL (talk) 16:53, 30 September 2010 (UTC)
Fair enough, I was looking at the (presumably official) logo in the Aeromodeller article where it is spelt with a K. I'm not sure where the 'akro' or 'acro' comes from as German for aerobatics is Kunstflug. The Grob Twin Astir glider comes in 'acro' versions with a 'c'!! I think I have that original article if it is not all available from the web. Cheers Nimbus (Cumulus nimbus floats by) 20:06, 30 September 2010 (UTC)
It's most likely from Akrobatik (acrobatics!). Nimbus (Cumulus nimbus floats by) 20:09, 30 September 2010 (UTC)
The owner of F-AZJF thinks its a "C" http://www.airport-data.com/aircraft/photo/302214L.html the FAA uses acrostar http://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/media/Order/Basic7340.2A.pdf and ICAO 8643 - Aircraft Type Designators http://www.icao.int/anb/ais/8643/index.cfm uses Acrostar. MilborneOne (talk) 22:26, 30 September 2010 (UTC)
It's a weird one, Neil Williams (pilot) calls it an 'Akrostar' in his book. He should really have an article, surprised there is not one already. He notes the coupled flap/elevator system and some stability problems fixed by anti-balance tabs.Nimbus (Cumulus nimbus floats by) 23:10, 30 September 2010 (UTC)
Acrostar for the aircraft Hirth HI 27 is correctly written with a "c". Taking a "k" is an assumption of German writing that is not really correct. Sounds like German, but really comes from sources outside Germany. Since "star" is English, also "Acro" is spelt in the English version. Take this from the owner of the only Acrostar still in regular operation. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 213.200.225.76 (talk) 07:52, 27 July 2012 (UTC)
Note the designer Wagner's own book "Acrostar, Krafteier und Kugelmotoren" - (google, 'About 44,500 results.') wiφ 15:29, 3 March 2013 (UTC) — Preceding unsigned comment added by WiPhi (talkcontribs)