Talk:History of Ecuador

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WikiProject Ecuador (Rated B-class, Top-importance)
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This article was WikiProject Ecuador's August 2006 article of the month on the Ecuador Portal.
WikiProject History (Rated B-class)
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Name Ecuador[edit]

So... when was the name Ecuador chosen? Was it named after the equator? --SPUI (talk) 14:30, 23 October 2005 (UTC)

Evidently, and it must have been chosen May 1830. 200.63.231.224 21:39, 26 October 2005 (UTC)

Removed some text[edit]

This was in the See Also section: 200.63.231.224 21:37, 26 October 2005 (UTC)

On June 7 2005, Lucio announced from Brazil that he was about to resign to his condition of political refugee and go back to Ecuador. His come back will be made through Miami, hometown of many Ecuadorian legally prosecuted bankers who may be supporting Lucio's coming back to political scene in Ecuador.
Many suspect that his return is made in the sake of some sort political pressure that U.S. Government and IMF is applying on Palacio's government in order to set up a new economic administration team much more closer to the objetives of the U.S. department of state and the international financial institutions.
As of August 7 2005, former Ecuadorian President Lucio Gutierrez is staying temporarily at a beach resort in the country of Peru, just minutes away from the Ecuadorian border. He says he will return to Ecuador to face his trial, though at the moment there is a warrant for his arrest.

Incas[edit]

I understand from the Wikipedia piece on the Inca Empire - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inca - that the Incas controlled large parts of Ecuador for nearly a century before the Spanish arrived, yet this piece barely refers to that period.

I'm not an expert, and simply cutting and pasting from one piece to another seems a little rude, but perhaps someone a little better informed could add something? Jonecc 10:46, 18 May 2006 (UTC)

Independance from Colombia[edit]

Would it be possible to give some more details on why Ecuador became independant from Colombia in 1830. What were the reasons behind that? Indisciplined 20:49, 10 August 2006 (UTC)

Note about changes[edit]

This article needs some major work. It is full of inconsistencies and half-truths. I cleaned it up as best I could, however, lots remains to be done. Among other things, I deleted this passage because it is redundant:

Antonio José de Sucre Alcalá lead the Ecuadorian separatist forces to victory. Ecuador's criollo population tried several times to take control of the Quito Audencia in the decade that followed Napoleon's invasion of Spain, but it was not until 1820 that the criollos had enough force to realize emancipation from Spanish colonial rule. In October 1820, in Guayaquil, a junta under the leadership of José Joaquín Olmedo declared Ecuador's independence from its colonial master. Unlike the earlier juntas, Olmedo appealed to Argentina and Venezuela for support. Ecuador's identification with the wider South American independence movement - led principally by Venezuelan Simón Bolívar Palacios and the Argentinean José de San Martín - was ultimately what permitted it to throw off the shackles of Spanish domination as early as it did. Without help from Bolívar and San Martín, Ecuador likely would have languished under colonial rule for at least a few more decades.

Bolívar and San Martín heeded Olmedo's call for help, sending him significant contingents of troops and a number of skilled officers. Antonio José de Sucre Alcalá led the combined Ecuadorian and foreign forces to a number of successive victories before finally being stopped at the city of Ambato in the highlands south of Quito. The royalist success was short lived, Martín sent Sucre the necessary reinforcements and the brilliant young lieutenant went on the offensive again. After another series of triumphs and a decisive victory at the Battle of Pichincha on May 24, 1822, Ecuador achieved its independence. Within hours of his victory on the slopes the volcano outside of Quito, Sucre received the formal surrender of the Quito Audiencia.

Tsekub 12:32, 27 December 2006 (UTC)

Copywrite Issues[edit]

The bulk of the document seems to have "blatent copywrite infringement" issues. In trying seperate some of the heavy text to other pages I unknowningly naming a moved section the same as the original. And was advised the text was was directly copied from The Library of Congress Country Studies pages. Looking at the Library of Congress the bulk of the article seems to be copied. obv (talk) 16:04, 16 November 2008 (UTC)

Daughter page issues[edit]

A number of new pages have been created in an effort to shorten this one; however, in the process, the references and external links were left behind, leaving these articles without citations or real context. If any further daughter pages are to be made, please ensure that they have at least a few references, per Wikipedia guidelines. The pages that prompted this message include History of Ecuador 1925-1944: Reform, Chaos and Debacle, History of Ecuador: The Early Republic, History of Ecuador: Era of Conservatism, and The History of Ecuador: Rule of the Liberals. Thanks! Nikkimaria (talk) 23:17, 14 December 2008 (UTC)

All of these pages were from the same source. The original pages were copied directly from The Library of Congress Country Studies pages and as stated above some were deleted due to "blatent copywrite issues". Have been working at creating new non-"blantent copywrite" pages with cites for all of the new pages.obv (talk) 03:14, 16 December 2008 (UTC) kkk —Preceding unsigned comment added by 74.44.210.72 (talk) 01:41, 10 March 2010 (UTC)

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founding of Quito[edit]

I believe, and correct me if I'm wrong, that Quito existed before the arrival of the Spanish, contradicting the introduction which says that it was founded by the Spanish. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 118.210.66.18 (talk) 08:49, 21 November 2011 (UTC)