Talk:History of Galway

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WikiProject History (Rated C-class, Mid-importance)
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Galway has a fascinating and unique medieval history, very different from that of the rest of the province of Connacht. It's history certainly deserves a separate article, to which I (and hopefully others) will add greatly to over time.--File Éireann 22:56, 18 Feb 2005 (UTC)

No mention of the wreck of the Spanish Armada and subsequent settlement of the survivors in Galway? Maybe that's my tourist's view of an interesting historical event. -Gregganainm

20th Century[edit]

I know that the Irish Army Barracks at Renmore was the headquarters of the Connaught Rangers (see that article).

Today it is known as Dún Úi Maoilíosa - Mellowes Barracks, for Líam Mellows who led the East Galway IRA in the War of Independence. But I also understand that he was on the anti-Treaty side in the Civil War and was responsible for the 1921 edition of the Sieges of Galway. So did deV rehabilitate him? What happened? His statue is (or was last time I looked, might be a car park now!) at the bottom of Prospect Hill?

Something about these ought to go in the 20th Century section. I'd do it, but as is evident from above, I don't have much of a clue! --Red King 23:37, 1 Jun 2005 (UTC)

the Bishop Casey scandal is mentioned yet the entire Celtic Tiger boom isn't? the 20th century section seriously needs to be expanded on. (Leninbenjamin 13:20, 5 April 2006 (UTC))

Cathair na Gaillimhe[edit]

An anon editor asserts In Irish, Galway is also called Cathair na Gaillimhe ("city of Galway") which is a modern creation to prevent confusion with Contae na Gaillimhe / County Galway which is often incorrectly called Gaillimh in Irish.. [Bold text not in original - just a device to cope with italics within italics.] At school, I learned that Cathair in this context means castle, the castle or fortified town (Caher) on the river Gaillimh. Is there any evidence to support the claim that it is a modern usage? (1920s retrospective Gaelicisation?) --Red King 16:42, 30 September 2005 (UTC)

Yes, because when it was founded back in the 12th century, it was referred to as "Bun (sic) Dun Gallimhe" (fort at the mouth of the Gallimhe), or "Bun Gallimhe". See references in annals of the time, and the Four Masters. Personally, when signing corrospondence, I use the form Dun Gallimhe. Remember, up to and including today, the legal name of the river is the Gallimhe or Galway; Corrib is only the popular usage. Cathair na Gallimhe I have always regarded as a rather forced modern form. Fergananim 23:12, 30 September 2005 (UTC)

The official Irish name for Galway city is 'Cathair na Gaillimhe'. Look at the official website of the Galway City Council. It says 'Comhairle Cathrach na Gaillimhe' (not cathair because of genitive case). The same logo appears on all Galway City Council documents. The word cathair means city. Origins in a stone fort but in Modern Irish it means city. 86.46.44.89 (talk) 15:31, 29 September 2011 (UTC)