Talk:History of Kansas

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Flowery[edit]

This language of this article is, shall we say, a bit flowery for an encyclopedia. "The sweet assuring smile of peace fell on Kansas..."?

Isn't there a "sweet assuring smile of peace" in the heartland ... ;-] ... JDR
sounds like cribbing from an unidentified source.

4.249.63.20 (talk) 13:02, 23 September 2010 (UTC)

Troubles in Kansas[edit]

The "Troubles in Kansas" section mentions that Indians are still roaming, plundering, and murdering our pioneers in Kansas today.

Call me crazy, but perhaps this should go in past tense.

Yep ... I don't think the Injuns are roaming, plundering, and murdering anyone ... JDR 15:01, 21 October 2005 (UTC)

Originality of content[edit]

I doubt the content of this article is original or rephrased. It seems a bit of a cut-and-paste dealio. I'd like the author to confirm it's originality, or do a better citation of it's source lest we suffer the plague of plagurism! --Duemellon 18:49, 27 August 2005 (UTC)

No plagurism ... the article began with Cutler's 1883 text (public domain). JDR 15:01, 21 October 2005 (UTC)

Patowamie Masscare[edit]

Has it's own page. I suggest we move the bit about it to that page & reduce this page's explanation (as the stub-article is pretty small). However, I'm a bit hesitant to do it myself as I have just noted I'm concerned this might be a copy-paste article. --Duemellon 18:49, 27 August 2005 (UTC)

Cutler's 1883 text is in the public domain.
I moved, IIRc, the text. JDR 15:01, 21 October 2005 (UTC)

Fort Leavenworth[edit]

To the anonymous user, please note the Fort Leavenworth is already mentioned in the article; you keep adding text that is an exact duplicate of text found four paragraphs above. That is why I deleted it. Kgwo1972 19:58, 7 June 2006 (UTC)

Bogardus Massacre[edit]

I am very new here. However, should we forget the Bogardus Massacre? How does one include it without stepping on the original work?

http://www.lasr.net/pages/city.php?Beloit&Kansas&City_ID=KS0806003&VA=Y&Attraction_ID=KS0806003a008

This would be your reference: Bell-Bogardus Indian Massacre and Cemetery, August 12, 1868. Put the info @ Solomon River (Kansas) or at Willow Springs (Beloit, Kansas) or here in the proper timeline. State that the Arapahos and Cheyennes attacked the settlers. The massacre victims were buried in Bell Bogardus Massacre Cemetery on West Asher Creek near the Asherville Township, section 21-7-6 (close to 30 rods north of the section line near Old Highway 24). You could also note that the Bell Bogardus Massacre Cemetery in Mitchell County was the first one in the county. J. D. Redding 19:27, 15 April 2007 (UTC)

Nicodemus[edit]

I changed the wording in the Exoduster section to correct the misinformation on the town of Nicodemus. Nicodemus was not founded by the Exodusters. The Exodusters arrived in Kansas in 1879, two full years after the 1877 founding of Nicodeums. The town of Nicodemus was an organized settlement that came to Kansas directly from Kentucky, whereas the Exoduster Movement was unorganized from many parts of the South. Plus, the Exodusters were dirt poor and had no money to start a town on their own. Read any of the academic references listed on the Nicodemus, Kansas page for confirmation of this. StudierMalMarburg 18:51, 5 April 2007 (UTC)

Nero Mammoths[edit]

Hi guys,

I sort of have a question for you!

This sentence appears on History of Kansas and History of Arizona: In a sense, the hunters who pursued the Nero mammoths may have represented the first of north Great plains cycle of boom and bust, relentlessly exploiting the resources until it has been depleted or destroyed.

Now, here is my question: what on earth were Nero Mammoths? The only places on the web were these poor beasts are mentioned are... History of Kansas and History of Arizona!

Thank you for answering or commenting...—The preceding unsigned comment was added by 194.254.71.2 (talkcontribs) 14:33, August 16, 2007 (UTC)

I have changed the term to mammoths and left a note at User talk:Reddi asking for clarification. Flyguy649 talk contribs 16:26, 16 August 2007 (UTC)
OK, I would have done that myself but I prefer not to contribute in a non-mother language. I left a note to Reddi myself before. This is weird, the whole think doesn't sound like Reddi coined the term himself, but Nero mammoth are truely inconnus au bataillon! Thank you anyway, Hervé 194.254.71.2 07:23, 17 August 2007 (UTC)

Yep ... don't know about the "nero mammoths" ... there were mammoths though ... must have slipped though ... thanks for the catch. The hunters did pursued the mammoths ... and it may have represented the first of north Great plains cycle ... I'll see if I can get a references for it ... till then it can stay out ... J. D. Redding 15:03, 9 September 2007 (UTC)