Talk:History of Maxwell's equations

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Split from Maxwell's equations[edit]

I didn't write any of this content - the Maxwell's equation article became so long, including (surprise surprise) the history section that a number of editors (including myself) decided the history section could make it's own article. I did so to see how it would turn out. The idea was proposed by user:Fgnievinski and others here. If there is a strong consensus to merge it back we can always revert the changes and redirect this article back to Maxwell's equations.

For reference here is the very first edit summary:

split History from Maxwell's equations - see Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Physics#Maxwell's equations: WP:LINKFARM for Further reading? History split to new article? and talk:Maxwell's equations

M∧Ŝc2ħεИτlk 07:53, 5 May 2013 (UTC)

Ordered list[edit]

"On Physical Lines of Force" should include an ordered list, but for some reason, each item is labeled "1." 172.56.27.150 (talk) 17:46, 8 May 2014 (UTC)

Circuital[edit]

The expression "Ampere's Circuital Law" leaves something to be desired. It seems to imply that Ampere found a round-about way of expressing an idea. (Also, the pronunciation of "circuital" isn't reminiscent of "circuit".) Could the word "circuit" be substituted for "circuital" (despite its application as an adjective, rather than a noun), since circuital manners of speech are decidedly yucky? I'm not familiar with the law nor its application, but I presume it has more to do with circuits than with how Ampere used circumlocution to get his idea across. 208.54.85.203 (talk) 18:09, 8 May 2014 (UTC)

Symbols[edit]

I'd like to see the mu, epsilon, and bold-faced B and H identified. 172.56.26.177 (talk) 18:51, 8 May 2014 (UTC)

Opening sentence[edit]

It wasn't until I moved my cursor to "fundamental" and "fields" that I discovered that these words were being used in special ways. I'd assumed that "fundamental fields" was equivalent to "basic branches", but seeing the titles of the articles to which they were linked made me realize that I didn't understand the sentence at all.

"In electromagnetism, one of the fundamental fields of physics..."

It never occurred to me that fundamental had anything to do with "interaction", or that electromagnetism was a "field". Nor do I consider these facts important to bear in mind when approaching this article from the outset. I'd like to see it start out on a footing which doesn't expect such sophistication on the part of the reader, but introduces concepts in a manner closer to the way physics itself evolved historically. We can take for granted that everybody knows that electricity and magnetism exist, and are interrelated somehow, and that "electromagnetism" refers to that relationship, but that, I think, ought to be the limit of our assumptions about readers who might take an interest in this subject, most of whom might be interested in history, but aren't well versed in physics. 172.56.27.234 (talk) 19:22, 8 May 2014 (UTC)

Pronunciation of Maxwell's middle name[edit]

I wonder whether Maxwell pronounced his middle name "clark". 208.54.85.226 (talk) 19:41, 8 May 2014 (UTC)