Talk:History of Pomerania (1945–present)

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untitled section[edit]

I don't think such article is needed. If it would be consolidated and connected it would be ok, but the area is too seperate in history and developments to deserve a unified history. It just looks akward. We Italic textdon't have "History of Black Sea basin" article. The article should be splitted into history of specific countries administrative zones.--Molobo (talk) 23:15, 19 December 2008 (UTC)

I am not so sure about this. History of Pomerania (region) seems a notable topic. Histories don't have to be "by country", by region (History of Europe) or city (History of Warsaw) seem like good ideas as well.--Piotr Konieczny aka Prokonsul Piotrus| talk 15:51, 20 December 2008 (UTC)
There are multiple articles on the history of regions in wiki. There are also several books on the subject, so the topic is notable. Skäpperöd (talk) 08:32, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

All German placenames were replaced with Polish[ or Polonized medieval Slavic one[edit]

What about Germanised Polish and Slavic names from before from Prussian, German Empire and Nazi period including occupation. Weren't they restored ? --Molobo (talk) 17:22, 20 December 2008 (UTC)

The medieval Slavic placenames were in most cases adopted during the German period and do not equal the post-45 names. What names besides "Gotenhafen" were changed? Skäpperöd (talk) 08:32, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

Several.

Ruch polski na Slasku Opolskim w latach 1922-1939‎ - Page 109 Marek Masnyk - 1989 On the initiative of Bund Deutscher Osten, all sings of the Polish origin were being removed by germanization of Polish place names, inscriptions on houses.

The process was made both by German Empire and Nazi Germany.--Molobo (talk) 15:40, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

Till 1933 7 changes:examples Brzezetz to Birken Brzeźce), Dziergowitz na Oderwalde (dziś Dziergowice). in 1933 r. two names changes, in 1934 23 changes, 1935 29, in 1936 intesifcation of the campaign and 1088 town and place names have been Germanised. In 1937 160. In Legnica area and Wrocław area the effort was continued-Wrocław 359 place names changed to German versions, in Legnica 178. From Monika Choroś, Łucja Jarczak Państwowy Instytut Naukowy Instytut Śląski

These examples are from Upper Silesia, not from Pomerania. HerkusMonte (talk) 16:13, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

Examples I have found just in a few seconds: Borzyszkowy-Bergfried Brzemiona- Bremin ; Eibenfelde-Cisewia Reinwasser-Czapiewice Moorbach Czarniż Sophienwalde-Dziemiany Główczewic -Lauschen[1]

120 Slavonic place names were translated into German in Pomerania. The Language of the Third Reich: LTI - Lingua Tertii Imperii: A Philologist's Notebook page 75 Victor Klemperer, Martin Brady Przetłumaczona przez Martin Brady Continuum International Publishing Group, 2006 --Molobo (talk) 17:10, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

Ok, 120 is a number one can work with. One must however put these 120 locations in relation to the overall number of towns and villages in Pomerania, so it turns out to be a very tiny portion. Also, the examples are all of Pomerelia, are there examples of name changes in that part of Pomerania that became "recovered territory", and if, did the new Polish name resemble the former one? That has to be answered first, than we can state if/how many placenames were restored rather than changed. Skäpperöd (talk) 19:48, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

the footprints of centuries of German history and culture from public view[edit]

Why ? Just because they were German ? We should explain to reader why such decision was made. We should also note what made the centuries of German history shared with Poles-racial discrimination, settlement action to erase Polish presence, attempted extermination of Polish people. Right now it is lacking.--Molobo (talk) 17:25, 20 December 2008 (UTC)

In Farther Pomerania, no such thing took place simply because it lacked a notable Polish minority. The Nazi era is covered in the article 1933-1945. Skäpperöd (talk) 08:32, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

"In Farther Pomerania, no such thing took place simply because it lacked a notable Polish minority" Please present sources that Nazi Germany only classified Poles as untermenschen if they were above 30,000 people. I find your argument hardly serious. And your sentences speaks about German history-genocide of Polish people is part of it and notable if we are talking about Polish lack of enthusiasm to be surrounded by its remains.--Molobo (talk) 17:10, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

You still confuse the areas. Your source says Poles "lived along the border of the Poznan/Pomorze region (22,500-27,000)". That is roughly the Netze/Notec valley and adjacent areas. This border region "Pomorze/Poznan" is southern Pomerelia and Neumark, not Farther Pomerania (Hinterpommern), not Hither Pomerania (Vorpommern). It was organized in the province of Posen-West Prussia during the time the source covers. As I noted already, the Schneidemühl/Pila district (Regierungsbezirk) formerly belonging to that province was made part of the Province of Pomerania during WWII - this area had a Polish minority, but one cannot apply the estimate above to that area, given that it is from the 1920s and covers a much larger area. Also, nothing is said by the source about the fate of them. Skäpperöd (talk) 19:48, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

No you are incorrect and pushing Original Research. Our ethnic maps clearly indicated Polish population in Farther Pomerania and Szczecin, where Polish population was subject to discrimination and arrests in 1939.--Molobo (talk) 14:51, 15 February 2009 (UTC)

Several changes[edit]

I added clarification requests to many authorative statements. All art was removed for example ? Seems hardly the case. Thum writes about Wrocław not Pomerania. Additionaly I removed the statements coming from known RAŚ supporter-a seperatist supporter hardly constitutes a reliable source of information. Added on Polish minority in the region and fixed double naming issues. The article still is in terrible shape and needs changes to become neutral and not biased towards somewhat nationalist German view.--Molobo (talk) 17:40, 20 December 2008 (UTC)

The paragraphs you added fact tags to are sourced, so I removed them. The sentence does not stae all art. Thum is primarily about Wroclaw/Breslau, but not exclusively. Before removing sourced content you need to prove Kamusella's unreliability. Polish minority in the region in question (Farther Pomerania) was not notable. Double naming does not mean to remove one, but to have both. It needs to be explained what is nationalist German POV here, the sources used are not of that kind. Skäpperöd (talk) 08:32, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

Polish minority in the region in question (Farther Pomerania) was not notable" Wynot names Pomorze, not your exlusive Farther Pomerania. As to "not notable" this is your personal view. "Double naming does not mean to remove one, but to have both" Only in case there is a shared history. Or are you arguing we should add Szczecin in all instances where Stettin is named ? As to claims I wanted verified none were sourced.--Molobo (talk) 16:01, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

You still confuse the areas. Your source says Poles "lived along the border of the Poznan/Pomorze region (22,500-27,000)". That is roughly the Netze/Notec valley and adjacent areas. This border region "Pomorze/Poznan" is southern Pomerelia and Neumark, not Farther Pomerania (Hinterpommern), not Hither Pomerania (Vorpommern). It was organized in the province of Posen-West Prussia during the time the source covers. As I noted already, the Schneidemühl/Pila district (Regierungsbezirk) formerly belonging to that province was made part of the Province of Pomerania during WWII - this area had a Polish minority, but one cannot apply the estimate above to that area, given that it is from the 1920s and covers a much larger area. Also, nothing is said by the source about the fate of them. Skäpperöd (talk) 19:48, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

No you are incorrect and pushing Original Research. Our ethnic maps clearly indicated Polish population in Farther Pomerania and Szczecin, where Polish population was subject to discrimination and arrests in 1939.--Molobo (talk) 14:51, 15 February 2009 (UTC)

During and after the war, the make-up of Mecklenburg and Vorpommern's population changed due to wartime losses and the influx of evacuees[edit]

"During and after the war, the make-up of Mecklenburg and Vorpommern's population changed due to wartime losses and the influx of evacuees" Why is genocide of Poles and Jews not mentioned as part of ethnic changes in those areas ?--Molobo (talk) 17:43, 20 December 2008 (UTC)

There were no Poles. The Jewish population of Pomerania had of course a terrible fate that is covered in the 1933-1945 article, but there were only extremely few of them so that did not have any notable impact on M-V's population. Skäpperöd (talk) 08:32, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

":There were no Poles."

The final group in this category lived along the border of the Poznan/Pomorze region (22,500-27,000), where, for the most part, they formed Polish islands surrounded by a German sea. The Poles in Germany, 1919-1939 Edward D. Wynot, Jr. . As usual remember to keep Original Research of yours away from Wiki. Scholary sources have different information then your view of non-existance of Poles in Germanised areas.--Molobo (talk) 10:49, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

And you think the region you pointed out here is anywhere close to Mecklenburg and Vorpommern? It is not. Skäpperöd (talk)

Mecjklenburg and Vorpommern are not in Pomerania region ? That's news to me. Oh I forgot to add that that Szczecin-germanised into Stettin and seat of regional capital of Pomerania, germanised into Pommern- housed a very strong local point of Polish activity, the 2000 Polish minority in the germanised city was very active in defending against national identity eradication. Their leaders even stated when faced with police crackdown during demonstration"Szczecin will be Polish once again". But of course this perhaps romantic even will be added later, after I will expand in full the situation of native people under the German rule and their resistance to Germanisation. It's just an example that your claim of non-existance of Poles is completely false and original research.--Molobo (talk) 12:54, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

  • Mecklenburg is the area west of Pomerania.
  • Stettin - not in the German part of Pomerania. If before the border shift of then close to 400,000 inhabitants of Stettin 2,000 were Poles (when?), that still does not make them a notable minority in Hither or Farther Pomerania, nor does that make them "native". Skäpperöd (talk) 13:10, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

Stettin - not in the German part of Pomerania I am sorry, but I don't understand. It surely wasn't a seperate state in 1918-1945 ? that still does not make them a notable minority According to whose criteria ? As explained your views are not something that we build Wikipedia upon. See original reasearch. And as explained this was focal point for circa 30,000 people later classified as something below dogs(untermenschen) and hunted for extinction by German state. This is completely notable as such even is unprencented in human history.--Molobo (talk) 13:28, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

You keep confusing time period and area:
  • Mecklenburg and Vorpommern since 1945 (the period of this article) do not include Stettin.
  • The other data provided by you shows that some 20,000 Poles lived along the border of Pomerania and Greater Poland after World War I (not II). This region was not a part of the province of Pomerania, however a part of this region (around Schneidemühl/Pila) was integrated into the province between late 1938 and 1945. This region is nowhere close to Vorpommern (Hither Pomerania). Skäpperöd (talk) 13:53, 21 December 2008 (UTC)
It should be mentioned that Mr. Wynot's numbers are based on Polish books of the 1960's[2], an background, ususally assessed rather critical. HerkusMonte (talk) 14:25, 21 December 2008 (UTC)
By all means present a critical review of professor Wynot's study regarding Polish minority.--Molobo (talk) 15:07, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

You still confuse the areas. Your source says Poles "lived along the border of the Poznan/Pomorze region (22,500-27,000)". That is roughly the Netze/Notec valley and adjacent areas. This border region "Pomorze/Poznan" is southern Pomerelia and Neumark, not Farther Pomerania (Hinterpommern), not Hither Pomerania (Vorpommern). It was organized in the province of Posen-West Prussia during the time the source covers. As I noted already, the Schneidemühl/Pila district (Regierungsbezirk) formerly belonging to that province was made part of the Province of Pomerania during WWII - this area had a Polish minority, but one cannot apply the estimate above to that area, given that it is from the 1920s and covers a much larger area. Also, nothing is said by the source about the fate of them. Skäpperöd (talk) 19:48, 21 December 2008 (UTC) No you are incorrect and pushing Original Research. Our ethnic maps clearly indicated Polish population in Farther Pomerania and Szczecin, where Polish population was subject to discrimination and arrests in 1939.--Molobo (talk) 14:51, 15 February 2009 (UTC)

Skapperods blind reverts.[edit]

Removed mention of genocide of Jews and Poles, restored seperatist claims, as well as non-existing terms as "valuta'.

I am awaiting Skapperods explanation why information about Polish and Jewish genocide was deleted by Skappperod as well as other changes. Also why were request for citation removed ? --Molobo (talk) 10:52, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

This [3] revert is explained in the sections above. You cannot just go ahead and remove everything referenced by a source you dislike. First you have to prove his unreliablity. Next, you cannot add fact tags all over sourced paragraphs. And all the other stuff is also explained above already. Skäpperöd (talk) 12:20, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

Nowhere it is explained. Do explain what 'valuta' is. Do explain why mention of genocide of Poles was deleted. None of the citations requests were added after a source. In regards to your "sourced paragraphs"-cosidering the experience with your sourcing it would recommended to look closer at many of them, and see the exact sentences. Btw-I noticed you still didn't removed a personal diary about "terror" of Allies against Nazi Germany as source of scholary info in one of your articles.--Molobo (talk) 12:32, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

  • valuta: [4] (Polish: waluta).
  • genocide on Poles: There was no notable Polish community in these areas, and therefore no genocide - see above.
  • referenced paragraphs: Wikipedia:Footnotes - "Material may be referenced mid-sentence or at the end of a sentence or paragraph." Skäpperöd (talk) 12:50, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

And why valuta and not currency ?

  • Not notable according to who ? Please clarify and remember that your personal views are of no importance here. And it wasn't genocide because it concerned only 27-30.000 people ? According to who ? Source please.
  • referenced paragraphs:

And there were no references before citation requests.--Molobo (talk) 12:57, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

Mecklenburg-Vorpommern is about 300 km west of the Poznan/Pomorze region (Mecklenburg about 500), I don't think this is disputed. This Polish map of the 1930's might be quiet usefull[5], there's no such minority marked on the map. BTW, the source The Poles in Germany, 1919-1939 is online, it would be extremely helpful, if you (Mo!) link such sources and give exact references.HerkusMonte (talk) 13:48, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

The link you mentioned is about the post-1945 area. The sentence we are talking about is about the area during the war. Actually the map you do point out to does point to Polish minority in Szczecin-germanised into Stettin. And this map actually shows that 20-40 % in border region with Polish Pomorze were Poles: [6]] --Molobo (talk) 13:59, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

We are talking about the post-war era and the influence of the war on Mecklenburg and VORPOMMERN, we're NOT talking about Polish Pomerania, quiet simple I think.HerkusMonte (talk) 14:15, 21 December 2008 (UTC)
You are incorrect. The sentence mentions changes during the war, and as Vorpommern is located on Pomorze then it has to include genocide of Jews and Poles as well under the German regime during the period. I see no problem and as essential to inform the reader about genocide of Jews and Poles made by German state-are you opposing including information about genocide by German state on Poles and Jews and if so on what ground ?

--Molobo (talk) 14:23, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

The article seperates the post-war history of German Pomerania (Vorpommern) and modern Polish Pomerania, there is and has not been a Polish minority in Vorpommern. The fate of Jews and Poles throughout the war is mentioned at History of Pomerania (1933-1945). To add an "information" about the fate of a Polish minority in Vorpommern would be simply absurd. HerkusMonte (talk) 14:32, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

there is and has not been a Polish minority in Vorpommern. Source please. And the current article already informs about the change to German population during the war. If Germans are mentioned and their fate during the war, then German genocide of Poles and Jews must be mentioned as well. I see no reason not to.--Molobo (talk) 14:44, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

"Source please" - is this a joke? HerkusMonte (talk) 14:51, 21 December 2008 (UTC)
No, it is a standard method of writing articles. Unless you have a source for your claims, it can't be inserted in the article. The source for Polish population remaining in Germanised territories of Szczcecin-germanised into Stettin and in Pomorze-germanised into Pommern is presented.--Molobo (talk) 15:08, 21 December 2008 (UTC)
You have not provided any source for a Polish minority in Vorpommern, and if you seriously believe there is or has been such a minority, this discussion is senseless.HerkusMonte (talk) 15:14, 21 December 2008 (UTC)
The final group in this category lived along the border of the Poznan/Pomorze region (22,500-27,000), where, for the most part, they formed Polish islands surrounded by a German sea. The Poles in Germany, 1919-1939 Edward D. Wynot, Jr. --Molobo (talk) 15:41, 21 December 2008 (UTC)
Is it so difficult? Vorpommern is 300 km west of the Poznan/Pomorze region. Mr. Wynot says nothing about Vorpommern. HerkusMonte (talk) 16:08, 21 December 2008 (UTC)
Please read carefully. The sentence in the article is not about post-1945 region but the region during the war and informs about change of German population during the war, while neglecting to inform about German genocide of Poles and Jews.--Molobo (talk) 16:12, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

You still confuse the areas. Your source says Poles "lived along the border of the Poznan/Pomorze region (22,500-27,000)". That is roughly the Netze/Notec valley and adjacent areas. This border region "Pomorze/Poznan" is southern Pomerelia and Neumark, not Farther Pomerania (Hinterpommern), not Hither Pomerania (Vorpommern). It was organized in the province of Posen-West Prussia during the time the source covers. As I noted already, the Schneidemühl/Pila district (Regierungsbezirk) formerly belonging to that province was made part of the Province of Pomerania during WWII - this area had a Polish minority, but one cannot apply the estimate above to that area, given that it is from the 1920s and covers a much larger area. Also, nothing is said by the source about the fate of them. Skäpperöd (talk) 19:48, 21 December 2008 (UTC) No you are incorrect and pushing Original Research. Our ethnic maps clearly indicated Polish population in Farther Pomerania and Szczecin, where Polish population was subject to discrimination and arrests in 1939.--Molobo (talk) 14:51, 15 February 2009 (UTC)

Discussion at WPPoland[edit]

Interested editors may want to see Wikipedia_talk:WikiProject_Poland#History_of_Pomerania_.281945.E2.80.93present.29. --Piotr Konieczny aka Prokonsul Piotrus| talk 15:58, 26 October 2009 (UTC)

B-class review: failed (Missing information, particularly on Polish part of Pomerania)[edit]

The section has major gaps in its coverage and errors. For example, it traces the "democratic era" to 1980, where the correct period is 1989 (the transition from communist to democratic rule, Autumn of Nations, fall of the Berlin Wall, etc.). The history section is missing mentions of major items from recent German-Polish relations, such as Warschauer Kniefall and the border treaties (Treaty_of_Warsaw_(1970), Treaty_of_Warsaw_(1970), German–Polish_Border_Treaty_(1990). Ostpolitik seems relevant. In the early history, the focus on expulsions seems somewhat undue; what about the non-German (Slavic) population of those territories that presumably remained unaffected by them? The article dedicates one short paragraphs to the "autochthons". This is just a cursory review for the WP:POLAND B-class, which the article fails; it is however large enough to classify for a C-class. --Piotr Konieczny aka Prokonsul Piotrus| talk 23:05, 7 February 2011 (UTC)

The basic problem is that this article really should be titled something like "History of Pomerania (1945-1947)" rather than (1945-present). The overwhelming singular focus is on 1945 and things that happened shortly afterward - basically as another excuse to CONTENT/POV-FORK the "expulsions" once again. Something like 60% to 70% of the content does not belong in the article in the sense that it should be just summarized and length should be cut. The parts on post-1947 appear to be tacked on mostly as an afterthought. Volunteer Marek  23:37, 7 February 2011 (UTC)

close paraphrasing, pov-ing of sources[edit]

In the section "Treatment and expulsion of Germans after the Potsdam Agreement"

Skapperod's version in the article Source text) Comments Source
"The remaining Germans were to be expelled from the now Polish areas of Pomerania.[24] The major staging area from which the Germans were deployed to post-war Germany was the Stettin-Scheune railway station, which had become infamous due to raids of gangs who raped and looted the expellees.[24] Germans were either transported by ship from Stettin to Lübeck or sent in trains to the British occupation zone.[24][25] "At this time a staging area was created at the Stettin-Scheune railway station which had become infamous. Despite protection from the (Polish) - VM) milicja the station was attacked by marauders who robbed and raped. This deterred further volunteers who wished to leave the area, despite the assurances by the (Polish - VM) authorities that such criminal activities were not going to be tolerated. "A bandit who robs a German, will also rob a Pole" - was the reasoning of administrator L. Borkowicz" In this instance the paraphrase is not that close. It is noteworthy however how the passage was doctored.
  1. The "marauders" were changed to "gangs". Elsewhere in the section Piskorski specifically states that these "organized gangs" were composed of Polish, Russian AND German deserters and marauders. The article tries to give the impression that they were composed of Poles.
  2. The fact that these were people leaving the city voluntarily is omitted.
  3. The response of Polish authorities and the illuminating quote from Borkowicz is omitted because it doesn't fit in with the POVed narrative being presented in the text.
Piskorski 1999
"Between November 20 and December 21, 1945, some 290,000 Germans were expelled.[14]" "Between November 20 and December 21, 1945, Polish authorities with the approval of the Soviet occupation authorities, organized the expulsion of some 290,000 Germans" Close paraphrasing, the part about Soviets being in actual control is omitted. Piskorski 1999
"Another major wave of expulsions termed "Jaskolka" (swallow) lasted from February 1946 to October 1947. During this operation, 760,000 Germans were expelled.[26] These expulsions were not indifferent, as Germans were grouped into five categories ranging from "obstructive" to "specialists", with the "obstructive" Germans becoming expelled first and the specialists last.[26]" In February 1946 another prepared mass expulsion action took place. It lasted until October 1947. As a result, 760,00 Germans were transported out of Western Pomerania. The action, termed "Jaskolka" was carried out across the whole territory. The Germans were grouped into five categories, and the first to be deported were in the so called "obstructive" one, and the last were from the group of specialists, difficult to replace. From Szczecin, which was a "collection point", transports went by sea to Lubeck or sent in trains to the British occupation zone." Close paraphrasing. Note the sentence about Lubeck and British occupation zone was simply moved, but not reworded. Piskorski 1999
"According to Piskorski, expellees were often not even allowed to carry household articles with them, and the few items they managed to take along were often robbed on the way.[26]" "The experience of expulsion itself varied greatly. Often the Germans were not allowed to take household appliances, and sometimes they were expelled in great hurry. Robbery was not uncommon, despite the appeals by the authorities for proper treatment of the expellees, with regard to the prestige of the country abroad. Even though the authorities were unable to guarantee the safety of the Germans during the expulsion, the British Mission evaluated the working of the Szczecin point positively, and the provided food and health care as adequate. Close paraphrasing with key words altered and relevant, qualifying information omitted.
  1. The fact that the experience varied greatly is omitted to make it fit into a POVed narrative.
  2. The appeals by Polish authorities for decent treatment are omitted.
  3. "Appliances" (possibly "equipment") was changed to "articles" but from the text it is obvious it's referring to stoves and washing machines, not pots and pans.
  4. The positive evaluation by the British Mission is omitted.
  5. The fact that food and health care was provided is omitted.
Piskorski 1999
"The Germans who were not yet expelled obtained the legal status of a "troublesome foreigner temporarily in Poland". They were not allowed to have communication devices like telephones or radios, and were restricted in when and where to go or move.[27]" "Legally they (the Germans in Pomerania) were considered troublesome foreigners, temporarily residing in Poland. Restrictions were introduced: a curfew, a ban on ownership of radios and telephones. Beginning in May 1946 it was forbidden for them to leave or change their place of residence" Mostly another problem of close paraphrasing. Scare quotes were added in article text that are not present in source. Piskorski 1999
"By the end of 1945, between 120,000 and 150,000 Germans were legally employed primarily in agriculture and fishing.[28] In the summer of 1946, there were 78,000 Germans employed on large farms, and about 90% of the employees of Polish state estates were German.[28] Germans were employed primarily because they were not subject to Polish civil law, were prohibited from joining workers' unions, and worked hard and for food only.[28] They were often preferred because of their low costs and also did illicit work.[28] In April 1946, the Polish authorities limited the daily work to ten hours and nominally adapted the Polish wages for German workers, but subtracted 25% for "reconstruction of the country and social purposes".[28] In March 1947, the Polish authorities in Dramburg leased the local Germans to Polish farmers for free.[28]" "By the end of 1945, in Western Pomerania, 120,000 to 150,000 persons (Germans) were legally employed, primarily in agriculture and fishery. In the summer of 1946, on the large farms, there were about 78,000 Germans employed. In the (Polish) State Agricultural Farms the Germans constituted 90% of the employees. The Germans were hired eagerly, since they were not subject to civil law, could not join workers' unions, worked for food and were willing to take the hardest jobs. (...) In March 1947, the county authorities in Drambug turned over the local Germans to the Peasant's Agricultural Cooperative. The farmers could lease them for unpaid work.

"Many of the Germans also worked "under the table". Despite the appeals by Polish authorities, Polish employers preferred to hire them than "more expansive" Polish workers. Only in April 1946, the Polish authorities regulated working and payment conditions for the German population. Daily work was limited to ten hours and Polish wages were adapted for German workers. However, the Germans were taxed 25% for reconstruction of the country and social purposes."

More or less faithful in terms of POV. Some scare quotes were added. Qualifier "nominally" was added. But pretty much a straight up copyright violation. Piskorski 1999
Along with the establishment of the People's Republic of Poland, the population had to be made to fit the new frontiers.[2]... Millions of "non-Poles" (mainly Germans and Ukrainians) had to be expelled from the new Poland, while the Poles east of the Curzon line had to be expelled from the Kresy. The expellees were termed "repatriates".[2] The result was the largest exchange of population in European history.[2] "All that remained was to make the population fit the frontiers. All the millions of "non-Poles", mainly Germans and Ukrainians, who lived on the wrong side of the new lines, had to be expelled from their homes; and millions of Poles, whose homes were now in the territory 'recovered' by the Soviet Union, had to be expelled to the People's Republic. (All the expellees were conveniently called "repatriates"). It was the biggest population exchange in European history ." Close paraphrasing, again. The sentences are cherry picked from an otherwise balanced essay by Norman Davies. "Myths and Nationhood"

Will keep filling this out as further passages are problematic as well.

 Volunteer Marek  17:41, 9 February 2011 (UTC)

What is "valuta"?[edit]

Since the article goes to great length to show alcohol induced Poles and Soviets persecuting innocent Germans(including manhunts with rapes, let's not forget about that either), perhaps it would be in order to explain what the mysterious "valuta" was? --MyMoloboaccount (talk) 12:53, 27 April 2011 (UTC)

I like the complaining about how "Restrictions (on Germans) were introduced: a curfew, a ban on ownership of radios and telephones. Beginning in May 1946 it was forbidden for them to leave or change their place of residence". So let's see, 1946, Pomerania, a German person owns a radio and gets caught with it - it gets taken away and the guy might be thrown in jail for a few days. Worse case scenario, expelled to Germany. Poland 1939-1945, a Polish person owns a radio and gets caught with it. He is executed without trial after extensive torture at Pawiak and his whole family, if they're lucky, are sent to concentration camps where they at least got a chance, however small, at survival. Probably a couple dozen innocent "hostages" get murdered as a reprisal for a "Partisan action". Same thing of course goes for these other restrictions. Yeah, this article's "balanced".Volunteer Marek (talk) 15:15, 27 April 2011 (UTC)

Don't forget that: Some(Germans) were also employed by the Soviet authorities in industry or its deconstruction, in agriculture, and in the clean-up of the wartime destruction, and were paid a low salary. Low salary!!! Did those atrocities knew any limits? I mean the Poles, Russians were just treated like untermenschen and shot at any whim, but Germans were paid low salary after the war...At certain point the article tries so hard that it becomes a parody.--MyMoloboaccount (talk) 15:20, 27 April 2011 (UTC)

Some numbers[edit]

I just counted the number of characters devoted to the period 1945-1949 and the rest, that is 1950 till 2011. So the first period encompasses 5 years, the other 62 years. There is a total of about 22197 characters devoted to the period 45-49, making that 4439 characters for each year. There is a total of 9897 characters devoted to the remaining 62 years, or about 159 characters per year. The entire 1950-2011 period gets exactly the same coverage as the 1948-1949 period. Ok, so someone could make an argument that 45-49 were particularly important years and depending on your perspective this could be true (though I think a lot of people would probably pick 1970 or 1980 or 1989 as far more important for present day). But still the four years get 220% more coverage than the remaining 62 years. On per year basis, each year after 1949 gets only .037 of the coverage that each year before 1950 does, or to put it another way, each year before 1950 gets 2700% (yes, thousands of percent) more coverage than each year after. Axe grinding, pov pushing, agenda anyone?

The whole article is at more than 30k characters which means it's already long. So while the post 1950 sections should be expanded, I think fixing this article and making less biased and unbalanced will most definitely involve taking out the scissors.Volunteer Marek (talk) 21:23, 27 April 2011 (UTC)

But not only scissors. Note that the article ignores completely the period from January 1945 till May 1945. In this way, the continued extermination of people classified as "untermenschen" is hidden, liberation of hundreds of thousands of slave workers from Germany, and ending of mass genocide against numerous people in the region, instead we jump immediately to fate of Germans. If this article will be balanced, then only after covering the early 1945 as well--MyMoloboaccount (talk) 21:54, 27 April 2011 (UTC)

The period till May 1945 or even longer should be discussed in History of Pomerania (1933–1945).Xx236 (talk) 13:27, 3 August 2012 (UTC)

What is the idea of this article?[edit]

The region was divided into Polish and German parts in 1945 and the two parts developed separately till 1990 or rather 2004 when Poland joined the EU. In my opinion the article should be removed, maybe some parts of the text moved to corresponding articles about regions in Germany and Poland. Xx236 (talk) 13:23, 3 August 2012 (UTC)

POV lede[edit]

from what in the People's Republic of Poland was propagated[1] to be recovered territory - the main subject of the article seems to be Communist propaganda 50 years old. Xx236 (talk) 13:40, 3 August 2012 (UTC)

"Die fremde Stadt" isn't about Stettin[edit]

The book is about Breslau. Please quote books about Pomerania.Xx236 (talk) 06:12, 7 August 2012 (UTC)

B-class review failed[edit]

This article is pretty close, but 1) few (very few, but still) paras are unreferenced/cite tags are needed. --Piotr Konieczny aka Prokonsul Piotrus| reply here 08:26, 27 March 2013 (UTC)