Talk:History of the Internet

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Former good article History of the Internet was one of the Engineering and technology good articles, but it has been removed from the list. There are suggestions below for improving the article to meet the good article criteria. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
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Edit request in two parts[edit]

In order to reduce whitespace and improve layout across more devices, please make two changes:

(1) Add:

__TOC__

immediately above the line:

{{Internet history timeline}}

(2) Shorten the name of the following section:

ARPANET to the federal wide area networks: MILNET, NSI, ESNet, CSNET, and NSFNET

to

From ARPANET to NSFNET


Thanks in advance. 68.165.77.221 (talk) 22:25, 22 July 2013 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done. I made the suggested edits. --Jeff Ogden (W163) (talk) 11:52, 23 July 2013 (UTC)

Article chronologically is wrong and biased[edit]

The internet starts with HTTP protocol and hypertext markup language. Protocols such as TCP / IP netware, and others were just technology used to develop the WEB and not its primary context. Say that these protocols were the basis for the internet, and they are cited as the Internet itself, is the same thing as saying that the creator of the internet were the fumes of Apache tribe, (no they would not think of distance communication). The HTTP protocol was "the big idea", since the documents could be hyperlinked with each other, creating a network of documents, THAT IS THE TRUE INTERNET. The story should start here, and only mention the technology that helped create the internet. Or change the wiki of automotive for the stone age and stone wheels.

(Tjnevorah (talk) 05:49, 23 September 2013 (UTC))

You are confusing the internet with the world wide web.24.108.28.165 (talk) 23:42, 24 March 2014 (UTC)

However, most people use the word "internet" to mean the world wide web. Perhaps the article should also discuss the relation between the 2 and the crucial role of Berners-Lee. At the moment it does indeed seem biased.Paulhummerman (talk) 17:24, 25 April 2014 (UTC)

There is an existing discussion of this at Internet#Terminology. There are also two other articles that cover the WWW and Berners-Lee's role: World Wide Web and History of the World Wide Web. -Jeff Ogden (W163) (talk) 03:04, 22 June 2014 (UTC)

Edit request for clumsy sentence structure[edit]

Totally nitty, I know, but the phrase "The Internet's takeover over the global communication landscape" in the last paragraph of the intro really grates. Maybe change to "The Internet's takeover of the global communication landscape"?

Drhayes (talk) 14:55, 31 October 2013 (UTC)

Done. Thanks. --Stfg (talk) 15:14, 31 October 2013 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 7 March 2014[edit]

Her is a citation for "The first ARPANET link was established between the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and the Stanford Research Institute at 22:30 hours on October 29, 1969." http://gizmodo.com/this-is-the-room-where-the-internet-was-born-1527205592.

Margcphelan (talk) 18:04, 7 March 2014 (UTC)

Not done: I can't seem to find this in the source.
Pictogram voting info.svg Note: You should be autoconfirmed and able to edit this page yourself. Anon126 (talk - contribs) 23:01, 9 March 2014 (UTC)

Source for Lickliler and Clark (1962)[edit]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Internet#Three_terminals_and_an_ARPA Fourth row. Proposed citation:

http://doczine.com/bigdata/2/1367101152_1399076c53/046f1309d01.pdf --Erkebrad (talk) 13:19, 18 March 2014 (UTC)


Licklider and Welden Clark published the paper "On-Line Man Computer Communication",[citation needed][edit]

http://doczine.com/bigdata/2/1367101152_1399076c53/046f1309d01.pdf
Can this be considered as a valid source?
Diego bf109 (talk) 18:32, 7 April 2014 (UTC)

My name (Ben Segal) wrongly redirected[edit]

I just noticed that in Section 6.1, CERN, the European Internet, the link to the Pacific and beyond, the reference 36 correctly refers to a paper by me (Ben Segal of CERN) but my name is linked to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Segal which in turn gets redirected to a page of a deceased person named Judah Segal.

How can this be fixed?

Ben

Bsegal (talk) 13:09, 29 April 2014 (UTC)

PS: I have just requested via Wikipedia:Articles for creation/Redirects that this erroneous redirect from Ben_Segal to Judah_Segal be removed so maybe you do not need to do anything.

PPS: Do you recommend that I propose having my own Wikipedia page?

Bsegal (talk) 13:38, 29 April 2014 (UTC)

OK, I have fixed the erroneous redirect which now points to my Wiki User page. Bsegal (talk) 09:35, 31 May 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 10 May 2014[edit]

Hyperlink "packet networking" to "Network pack" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_packet) in the second sentence. BrendanDHarris (talk) 03:37, 10 May 2014 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done 123chess456 (talk) 04:09, 10 May 2014 (UTC)

Nuclear War 'Myth'[edit]

I have removed the following:

The widespread urban legend that the Internet was designed to resist a nuclear attack likely arose as a result of Baran's earlier work on packet switching, which did focus on redundancy in the face of a nuclear "holocaust".[1][2]

It appears to be undeniable that Paul Baran's work with the RAND Corporation played a part in the development of the Internet. The story is not an 'urban legend' but at worst an exaggeration or oversimplification. The Johnson article provides no evidence that the Internet was created from 'economic necessity' and simply plays down Baran's role. This link - [1] - in fact confirms the nuclear war story.--Jack Upland (talk) 10:49, 25 May 2014 (UTC)

  1. ^ Baran, Paul (May 27, 1960). Reliable Digital Communications Using Unreliable Network Repeater Nodes (PDF). The RAND Corporation. p. 1. Retrieved July 25, 2012. 
  2. ^ Johna Till Johnson (June 7, 2004). "'Net was born of economic necessity, not fear". Retrieved July 25, 2012.