Talk:History of the web browser

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Image copyright problem with Image:Netscape Navigator.png[edit]

The image Image:Netscape Navigator.png is used in this article under a claim of fair use, but it does not have an adequate explanation for why it meets the requirements for such images when used here. In particular, for each page the image is used on, it must have an explanation linking to that page which explains why it needs to be used on that page. Please check

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This is an automated notice by FairuseBot. For assistance on the image use policy, see Wikipedia:Media copyright questions. --03:06, 23 September 2008 (UTC)

Missing Finnish Browser[edit]

I'm not adding this because I have not researched it. But I expect slashdotters to come snooping around here. According to this article, Mosiac was beaten a full year ahead by a graphical browser made by a group of Finns, thwarted only by a lack of funding: http://www.xconomy.com/national/2009/03/03/the-greatest-internet-pioneers-you-never-heard-of-the-story-of-erwise-and-four-finns-who-showed-the-way-to-the-web-browser/ If anyone wants to chew through it to make sure it's actually kosher (they've had no other interviews according to the article), that will likely be needed before Wikipedia can state it as a fact. Slashdot mention: http://tech.slashdot.org/firehose.pl?id=3615147&op=view 80.101.162.155 (talk) 19:47, 3 March 2009 (UTC)

1980s - 1990s paragraph biased?[edit]

Reading the 1980-1990s of the article, I find a lot of unsourced claims about fairly obscure software that is supposed to have been brilliant. It all sounds very "look at me, I was first" to me and I'm not even sure if those DOS programs could be considered web browsers. They were file browsers. Is this section as balanced and neutral as it is supposed to be? Can someone with more knowledge of the history of the web look into it? To me it looks strange that Berners-Lee only gets 3 sentences, for example. 109.178.127.161 (talk) 08:07, 4 May 2010 (UTC)

As the developer of Silversmith I am familiar with the issues you raise so I'll make a few comments.

1.)"unsourced claims": one of the criticisms of any statements about Silversmith (as an example) say something to the effect that there are few references to it on the web. I attribute that to the need for developers to move on to other work, and the brute fact that the web was not present at the time to serve as a journal of events. Conference papers from that period were not later put on the web so the record is scant. For Silversmith there is a paper trail of conference notes, sales documentation and experts in the field who are still active in the field who knew and used the product. Silversmith was designed in 1986 and its design approach of using the AAP tag set was the same approach as later used by TBLee for the Web. I sat on the AAP committee during the final review process. Both Tim and I had to face the question of how to make the tag set work on electronic documents. The "back" button was developed for Silversmith and was likely the first use of it.

2.) "file browsers": Yes, the early browsers were "file browsers", as are today's browsers. Today's web pages are also kept in files, so I believe your statement goes more to the communications associated with web browsers than to what was being read by the browsers. The same issues exists for a number of inventions. Should we argue that Edison didn't invent the light bulb because it was designed in a laboratory that did not include the transformers and transmission and distribution lines need for everyone to use light bulbs? We can make the same argument about television. It was a "single fuse-box" invention and it is recognized as an invention even though transmission capabilities for television signals did not exist at the time. So, media inventions should be decoupled from the communication channel they later use. If we do not do that, then the Web over wireless is not what TBLee developed, while clearly it would be.

3.) "DOS": DOS browsers did not have access to the resources of today's sophisticated SDK's which include page composition. During the development of Silversmith we had to develop tag set extensions for images and sound, create text-based page composition software, develop web pages, educate the public about this new way to visualize documents and continue with development. It seems remarkable to me that we were able to do that on a limited budget. Tim's work should not be diminished, he had the insight to commercialize a browser, which is something we were not able to do. I'm not sure that a word-count is the right metric to be applied to his contributions. Jbottoms76 (talk) 17:56, 15 July 2010 (UTC)

Mosaic was not the first browser[edit]

I am well aware that the article only begins by saying that Mosaic was the world's first POPULAR browser, but I am wondering whether we should change this, as - contrary to general belief - Mosaic was NOT the first ever browser. ACEOREVIVED (talk) 23:41, 13 July 2011 (UTC)

But was released prior to Cello at least. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 200.203.50.254 (talk) 03:06, 30 August 2012 (UTC)

Dave Ragget's Browser![edit]

[1]+[2]x[3]=[4] ||| [5]+[6]+[7]+[8]+[9]+[10]+[11]+[12]+[13]x[14]=[15] — Preceding unsigned comment added by 200.203.50.254 (talk) 03:36, 30 August 2012 (UTC)

For English English native speakers, evidences on the initial releases of two popular English English browsers!!! By Stewart Brodie, from Southampton University, ArcWeb ([16]+[17], same date as [18]), and, by Andrew Pullan, from the World, Webster ([19])!!! — Preceding unsigned comment added by 201.3.129.106 (talk) 22:46, 30 August 2012 (UTC)

Probably the origin of the .pl UA[edit]

... and a patriot possibly (I beg, use it, please): [20]. It seems foks were always aware about kinda javascripts and cookies.

BTW, copyrighted by nobody (what a national obesession for that).

Preferential Bias?[edit]

The section on Opera seemed to go out of it's way to mention how the browser was "innovative" and "speedy", and omitted the praise from other entries on Safari, Netscape, IE, etc. I've already made the edit to make the entry more neutral — Preceding unsigned comment added by 206.219.69.131 (talk) 15:56, 25 February 2014 (UTC)

hv3, d+[edit]

Missing from the chart: hv3, based on its own rendering engine in tk: http://tkhtml.tcl.tk/index.html; d+, a fork of Dillo: http://dplus-browser.sourceforge.net/ — Preceding unsigned comment added by ArthurDent006.5 (talkcontribs) 08:50, 28 August 2014 (UTC)