Talk:History of theology

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Christian Theology template[edit]

Should the Christian Theology template have been added to this page? Although it is admittedly rather uneven, I have tried to begin including Jewish theology, and intend to add more Islamic theology; I hope that others might be persuaded to add theologies or equivalents from other religious traditions as well. It seems to pull against that to brand the page as specifically and particularly Christian? --mah 11:36, 17 March 2006 (UTC)

Well done Mahigton, what an excellent job! Its so much better than my puny contribution. I think the article definitely needs to be linked into a series, otherwise people won't be sufficiently aware of its most excellent existence. However, I wonder whether it is better to have some kind of article on "Religious thought" in turn linked to this one, rather than try and contain non theistic religions or non "Judeo-Christian-Islamic" religions into the current piece. There is no way we can really include ethical confucianism in a theology article! Or Taoist thought or modern shamnistic reflection for that matter. That would not do them justice. Thoughts? Once again, thanks! --Totalthinker 01:12, 25 March 2006 (UTC)

Reversion of edit by 132.205.155.77[edit]

I removed the following material from the start of the section on theology on Classical Greece:

A theological approach to history tends to look at the existence of individuals under the judgement of God. With the existence of an absolute divinity a theological perspective takes on the role of man's purpose within this realm. A theological history, includes the work of St Augustine, The City of God. St Augustine was a Platonic thinker, unlike the works of St Thomas Aquinas who adopted an Aristotelian outlook.

Various reasons:

  1. The article is about the history of theology, not the theology of history;
  2. The history of theology has seen many different views of God propounded and defended, only some of which would be comfortable with the phrase 'absolute divinity';
  3. Similarly, only some historical theologies would see themselves as concerned with human purpose in the realm ruled by God;
  4. The figures mentioned do not belong in the section on classical Greek thought - and each is already mentioned further down the page; and
  5. While Augustine was certainly strongly influenced by neoplatonism, there is debate about whether he should himself be called a platonist - and Aquinas was deeply influenced by Plato as well as by Aristotle.

--mahigton 12:11, 29 November 2006 (UTC)