Talk:Holiday Inn

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Holidomes[edit]

The article repeatedly refers to the Holidomes, yet doesn't explain what they are: A 60's/70's Holiday Inn design with a traditional 2-story layout; however instead of surrounding a parking lot they feature balconies enclosing a courtyard featuring check-in, bar/restaurant, pool & landscaping, all evoking an outside resort. They played off the then-current "in the future we'll all live in climate-controlled domes" theme while providing travelers with a reliable place to relax in a faux outside & let their children burn off energy in a secure space. In this case the 'dome' was a standardized beam & board design with skylights. 24.91.16.234 05:33, 4 December 2007 (UTC) Michael

Merge the Great Sign article?[edit]

I added a photo of the old "Great Sign" that was used for 1950s and 1960s era. If you still want to merge the Great Sign article then go ahead but the description of the photo pretty much covers it. --[jonrev] 06:31, 21 August 2006 ( UTC )

Please keep the content of the Great Sign for it describes the American Icon well. Always room for improvement but the Great Sign should not just be described by a photo. Thanks — Preceding unsigned comment added by Gmconway1953 (talkcontribs) 15:43, 9 February 2014 (UTC)

Spokesmen[edit]

Can anyone find out who those three spokesmen from the Holiday Inn commercials are? I feel that series of commercials has become famous enough to warrant inclusion in the article.


the impact of Holiday Inn on the roadside and its travelers cannot be underestimated.

Is that really what is meant? Or should it read the impact of Holiday Inn on the roadside and its travelers cannot be overestimated?

Sebastjan

Actually, Crowne Plaza is a seperate brand. I actually work for Intercontinental Hotels group, and can attest that we are never, ever to refer to CP as a holiday inn...i am moving CP info to its own page: Crowne Plaza. [[User:JonMoore|JON, Conqueror of Men - (Talk to Me, Baby!)]] 22:31, 13 Nov 2004 (UTC)

Holiday inn Beirut[edit]

This page could do with a mention of the Holiday Inn in Beirut and a picture, surely there isn't a Holiday Inn as famous as this one 78.146.69.209 (talk) 20:28, 16 July 2008 (UTC)

File:First holiday inn.jpg Nominated for speedy Deletion[edit]

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Advertising[edit]

"It is one of the world's most recognized hotel brands with a global reputation for service, comfort and value." Wow, this is advertising pure and unconcealed! I would expect that in a commercial, not an encyclopedia. --46.183.96.224 (talk) 20:37, 19 June 2011 (UTC)

Relocated content[edit]

The following unreferenced content was relocated here from the article as original research/extraneous/and out of proportion in its significance to the article's subject.

Perhaps it can be reworked, edited down, and referenced, then re-integrated in some fraction back into the article.

Great Sign[edit]

The Great Sign as once seen on US highways in the 1950s, 60s, and 70s

The "Great Sign" is the roadside sign used by Holiday Inn during their original era of expansion in the 1950s-1970s. It consisted of a marquee box; a tower with either red, orange, or blue neon lighting, a large chasing arrow that always pointed towards the motel/hotel, and a four-stage flashing animated neon star at the top. It had 1,500 feet (460 m) of neon tubing and over 500 incandescent light bulbs. It was introduced by Kemmons Wilson when he opened his first motel on August 1, 1952. The signs were extremely large and eye-catching, but were expensive to construct and operate. The manufacturer of the sign was Balton & Sons Sign Company (now Balton Sign Company and Frank Balton Sign Company}, whose ancestor D.F. Balton founded Balton & Sons in Memphis in 1875. In shop sketch artists Gene Barber and Rowland Alexander did the original design of the sign. Original engineering drawings were also done by Rowland Alexander of Balton & Sons Sign Company. The story goes that the sign’s colors were selected because they were favorites of Wilson’s mother. The popularity of the sign led to many clones being produced, some of which remain to this day. In 1982, following Wilson's departure, the Holiday Inn board of directors made the decision to phase out the "Great Sign" in favor of a cheaper and less catchy backlit sign that still maintained the original backscript logo (this changed after the second remodel). The decision was not without controversy as it essentially signaled the end of the Wilson era and removed a widely recognized company icon. Wilson was angered about this, saying, "It was the worst mistake they ever made". Wilson so loved the sign that it was engraved on his tombstone. The majority of the signs were sold as scrap metal and recycled.

In 2003, in a program of hotel redesign, the company brought back a revamped version of the Great Sign that showed up the company's advertising under the slogan "Relax, it's Holiday Inn." The makeover came with a new prototype hotel that included photography of the sign and a retro-style diner named after founder Kemmons Wilson. The idea was later scrapped.

Several intact fragments of the famous sign have been restored and relit, mostly the Holiday Inn top section of the sign, and the marquee box. However, in 2006 a complete sign was finally found. The disassembled sign, complete with star, marquee box, and the sign base, was discovered in a backlot in Minnesota. On June 3, 2007 it was purchased by a neon sign restoration expert, in order to restore it to its 1950s glory. It is currently being restored and reassembled, and after completion, it will be displayed at the National Save the Neon Signs Museum in Minot, North Dakota. Also, an intact sign (sans the star section, but currently being worked on) that came from a Las Vegas location stands outside of the new American Sign Museum in Cincinnati Ohio. Another intact and operating Holiday Inn Great Sign is at "The Henry Ford" Museum in Dearborn, Michigan and one with a private collector in Kentucky. These signs are all that is left of a classic American Icon.



Wikiuser100 (talk) 04:39, 18 December 2013 (UTC)

Insufficiently germane content[edit]

The following content was relocated to Talk as insufficiently germane to the article's subject:

Historical trademark conflicts[edit]

  • For two decades, a hotel called Holiday Inn located in Niagara Falls, Ontario prevented the Holiday Inn Corporation from operating one of its own hotels in that city since the name was already in use. The hotel used a logo similar to the old Holiday Inn logo from the 1970s. The Holiday Inn Corporation directory referred to the hotel as "not part of this Holiday Inn system". The hotel also owned the holidayinn.com domain,[1] which forced the much larger corporation to use holiday-inn.com. In 2006, an agreement between IHG and the Niagara Falls, Ontario hotel owners was reached that allowed both the Hotel and Holidayinn.com to be incorporated into the IHG system.[2]
  • During the 1960s and early 1970s, Holiday Inn hotels located in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina were simply called "Holiday" because a local motel already had the "Holiday Inn" name. The name was contested by Holiday Inns, Inc. v Holiday Inn before the United States District Court for the District of South Carolina (Florence division) in 1973. The South Carolina Holiday Inn had franchised their name to Strand Development Corporation, which filed a counterclaim against Holiday Inns, Inc.[3] The dispute resulted in a concurrent use registration for the Myrtle Beach hotel, which still operates as "Holiday Inn", although it is required to use a distinctly different font.



In the sweep of Holiday Inn's history and breadth of the current enterprize the items are inconsequential.

Wikiuser100 (talk) 05:00, 18 December 2013 (UTC)

  1. ^ Holidayinn.com
  2. ^ Holiday Inn Niagara Falls
  3. ^ Holiday Inns, Inc. v. Holiday Inn, 364 F.Supp. 775 (S.C., 1973).