Talk:Holiday Inn (film)

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Kemmons Wilson[edit]

Kemmons Wilson saw this film and apparently named his hotel chain after it. Please confirm it, someone. --68.39.27.155 01:12, 10 December 2005 (UTC)

Really, I didnt knowthat???


Does anyone remember what the name of the Inn in the movie was? I cant remember, and I only had a copy of this movie on VHS and the question came up with a few friends, but my VHS tape faded.

Thanks in advance! ````DraconisOrion

Abraham/Lincoln's Birthday number[edit]

I have removed the reference to the term political correctness for two reasons. One, according to Wikipedia's own definition "The term "political correctness" is used almost exclusively in a pejorative sense" and therefore introduces an unacceptable POV element. Secondly, while it's almost certainly correct that they excised it so as to minimize offence to African-Americans, it is one of those claims that falls under Wikipedia's WP:REDFLAG rule, i.e., highly controversial statements must be backed up by reliable citations. So I've added wording consistent with the citation from Mueller's Astaire Dancing. I've also added a screenshot of Crosby in this number. D7240 (talk) 13:32, 3 March 2008 (UTC)

The Abraham segment (and the blackface itself) actually is significant to the plot of the movie and cutting it out makes the remaining action a little less understandable. The point of these scenes is that Crosby is trying to keep Astair from finding Reynolds because Astair wants to take her, whoever she may be, as his new dancing partner, and Crosby wants to keep her as his singing partner. So when Crosby realizes that Astair has arrived at the Lincoln's Day celebration in hopes of finding Reynolds, he makes a last minute decision for both of them to do their act in blackface, which turns out to be a sufficient disguise. Oddly enough, although the scenes are now clipped out everywhere, they may have been clipped out much earlier in theatrical and TV showings in the Deep South -- not out of racial sensitivity but because, when the movie first came out, there was substantial chunks of the white Southern population that still considered Lincoln a villain (less than four years later, Harry Truman's mother-in-law would refuse to stay in the Lincoln Bedroom for just such a reason). (I have suspected the verses are in the wrong sequence and the song should end with Reynold's verse about Nancy Hanks,)Sussmanbern (talk) 01:03, 10 February 2009 (UTC)

     The Abraham segment (and the "disguise" segment immediately

preceding, that shows the actors putting on blackface) has been clipped from all broadcast versions of this movie. In the semi-remake WHITE CHRISTMAS (1954), "Abraham" is used but without lyrics or any mention of Lincoln, as a "jazz dance". A great pity because Lincoln's bicentenary (Feb. 12, 1809) is coming up and the song itself is basically good -- without the minstrel show setting and with a slight rehab of a very few lines, it would be perfectly acceptable to all audiences. Sussmanbern (talk) 01:00, 10 February 2009 (UTC)71.178.242.140 (talk) 17:40, 30 December 2008 (UTC)

PC might be considered pejorative, but for comparison consider the frequent removal of "objectional" material from WB cartoons of that era, for example - minstrel shows and racial stereotypes, yes; but also extreme violence, suicides, and other stuff considered too "shocking" for today's kids to see; and thus the disclaimers on the DVD series. Maybe we'll get to the point someday where white and black Americans can look at this stuff and laugh about it together. I'm not sure we're there yet. Consider the firestorm over "Barack the Magic Negro", for example, especially by those who aren't paying close attention to it. Baseball Bugs What's up, Doc? 17:49, 30 December 2008 (UTC)

Proper grammar[edit]

I noticed a run-on sentence in the article and immediately corrected it. Thank You, 97.101.175.189 (talk) 23:47, 24 April 2008 (UTC)

Drunk Dance Scene[edit]

In an interview included as an extra on the DVD, Astaire's daughter claimed that Astaire had taken two shots of whiskey before the first take of the "You're Easy To Dance With" scene, and that he would take another shot between takes, so that by the time they reached the take used in the film he'd had a total of seven shots. Is there any substance to this claim? I suppose if anyone living today would know, it'd be his daughter. Still, I think it would be appropriate to get confirmation of this from an Astaire biographer.72.67.93.133 (talk) 05:33, 3 August 2008 (UTC)

It's in Astaire's autobiography, Steps in Time, on page 150: "Yes, you're right. I took two stiff hookers of bourbon before the first take and one before each succeeding take. I had to fall down on my face and be carried out for the finish. It was hot on that stage, too. All in all we did it seven times. The last one was the best." That would make eight shots in total. D7240 (talk) 21:17, 4 August 2008 (UTC)

Oh, How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning[edit]

"In addition the film features a brief use of 'Oh! How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning'" Huh? When, exactly? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.255.96.101 (talk) 14:30, 24 December 2010 (UTC)