Talk:Home network

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Could someone provide a diagram showing a typical home network setup? Gentaur 16:16, 23 December 2005 (UTC)

Hub[edit]

Isn't an Ethernet hub a rather odd piece of equipment to find in a home network? Don't almost all home Ethernets consist of a router with approximately four ports for computers plus one for the Internet connection, and no other boxes for hubs, switches or any other Ethernet equpment?

Shouldn't it be a Switch? I really don't think hubs are used in home networking. BTW Why home networking ?? This is more or less useless as it is just a LAN. It doesnt matter if its located in a home or an office, its still just a LAN. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 92.193.92.118 (talk) 10:38, 21 May 2010 (UTC)

Not too long ago I saw an Ethernet hub on the shelf at Walmart. What do you do if you have more computers than ports on your router? BTW, you're spot-on about "why home networking?" There are LANs and WANs. The IEEE disbanded the MAN committee because the concept never caught on. A PAN is just a very small LAN. A CAN is just a big LAN (unless it's a Controller Area Network, then it's a small LAN). A SAN isn't a network, it's a network service. There are too many *ANs already. We don't need another one. Rsduhamel (talk) 15:55, 17 November 2013 (UTC)

Server[edit]

Thank you, anonymous editor, for supplying the link to Setting up a Home Network but when you read the linked external page you will see it's really about a home server, not a network, so that's the Wikipedia article where the link belongs. Jim.henderson 17:40, 13 June 2007 (UTC)

more detail about home network[edit]

i have to do assignment. this is the question. Using the 802.11 LAN technologies,design a home network for your home. list the specific product models in your home network along with their cost. in your report,list the devices used along together with the model of devices and the cost —Preceding unsigned comment added by 210.48.156.52 (talk) 08:58, 26 August 2009 (UTC)


article title[edit]

This article discusses general aspects of networking in the home, i.e. residential networking, and should be renamed to home networking The term home network is better known in association with mobile networks. Kbrose (talk) 05:08, 9 December 2011 (UTC)


Beg to differ on the Could[edit]

'"The Cloud" has successfully abstracted away even the most simple of network infrastructure concepts from the average home user. It makes more sense for people without interest or experience in IT to migrate their assets to "The Cloud".' I could not disagree with this comment more. Perhaps a simplw reword to something like, 'People without interest or experience in IT may find it useful to place their sssets on "The Cloud."' Th eproblem with the original is that it's both an endorsement and encouragement for people to place their assets on the cloud. It may well be argued that it is convenient, but that, frankly is one of the few bonuses of the cloud. There are a large numbe rof downsides, particularly in the areas of security and privacy. See, for instance, Googles recent public statement that users of Gooogle Mail have no implicit right and should have no expectation of privacy in their e-mail communications because they are using Google's servers. The Cloud shouldn't be endorsed, merely described for informational purposes.

Infrastructure Devices[edit]

Text presumes the universe of infrastructure devices is contained within modems. I have neither DSL nor a cable modem as the infastructure device in my home. I get a direct ethernet connection out of my Verizon fiber box. Yes, ethernet, not cable that then goes through a cable modem. One might argue there is a fiber-ethernet converter in the FiOS box than can be considered a modem, but it's not in my house and it's certainly not DSL or cable modem. There are other, though admittedly rare, options as well. I think the text should be more generalized.157.185.95.23 (talk)mjd