Talk:Housebarn

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Merger proposal[edit]

Housebarn and Byre-dwelling are synonyms covering the same topic and should be merged. Jim Derby (talk) 00:49, 14 February 2013 (UTC)

  • Support I see no difference between the two topics. I have notified User:Staszek Lem to see if s/he would explain the difference. Royalbroil 02:11, 14 February 2013 (UTC)
  • No objction. I guess I created another page due to poor command of English. Staszek Lem (talk) 15:37, 14 February 2013 (UTC)
  • Comment. We need to do some more research on this before rushing into a merge. "Housebarn" appears to be a predominantly North American term where it refers to the Modern and Early Modern Era.1 "Byre dwelling" seems to be the European term (so Staszek you were not wrong at all!) and may refer to various types of building whose design goes back centuries, to the Medieval period and earlier. Both are reasonably common at googlebooks. There is also a third term used in the literature: "unit farmstead" or Einheitshof. We need to disentangle the usage of these terms. They may superficially appear to refer to the same thing, but in practice may refer to specific building types in different parts of the world. Perhaps "housebarn" should focus on North American practice and "byre dwelling" on European practice, but the 2 articles should cross-refer to each other. Alternatively the generic article could be "unit farmstead" as this seems to be the all-embracing term, with "housebarn" and "byre dwelling" either as subsections describing American and European practice, or as separate articles if large enough. --Bermicourt (talk) 07:04, 5 March 2013 (UTC)
  1. 1. The earliest use of the term "housebarn" is a 1931 American newspaper (Wells 1986)
  • Good feedback. I have no objection to using byre-dwelling or einhaus or einheitshof, etc. The older, European names are clearly more appropriate because of the common, widespread tradition of these house forms. Jim Derby (talk) 17:28, 12 March 2013 (UTC)
  • Yea, good feedback. Please research - this proposal can wait. Royalbroil 00:16, 13 March 2013 (UTC)
  • My research season is coming to an end so I want to say that the only reason I proposed housebarn as the title to keep was arbitrary: It was a larger article and the name barn-house already has a connotation of a barn conversion. Byre-dwelling is a good term. Barn in American English is a very loosly used term and most barns were multi-purpose buildings housing cows, hay, crop storage, equipment storage, manure storage (in some barns), and built in granaries. In Europe there seems to be more specific terms for each farm building depending on it's purpose. I have been looking for older, common names of these buildings and here is what I have found so far. I thought German einhaus (one house or all in one house) seemed good but it does not seem very common. German eindachhus is too specific. German wohnstallhaus (dwelling-stable-house, etc,) is in common usage and may also be a good term to use. (Germans widely use the term wohnhaus, (dwelling house) where Americans simply use the term house for a dwelling) Plattdüütsch buurnhuus (barn house or farmhouse) is obscure. The authors of The Village & House in the Middle Ages used the term "mixed house". That's all for now. Jim Derby (talk) 03:15, 28 March 2013 (UTC)
  • Good work, Jim, and thanks for all you're doing on this subject! --Bermicourt (talk) 06:45, 28 March 2013 (UTC)