Talk:Human development (biology)

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Missing classification?[edit]

I'm wondering to what classification a 3-10 year old human belongs. The article mentions birth-3 years, then jumps to 10 years. What is this middle ground (scientifically) refered to? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.21.143.155 (talk) 07:50, 16 January 2008 (UTC)

I'm missing the United Nations age group for "Youth"= upto 25 yrs, also in the USA and Europe this age group has special rights and programs for it.--OLPC - Sven AERTS (talk) 23:04, 29 March 2009 (UTC)

How about Active Elderly, referring to retired but active persons and Elderly, referring to people that are retired but not very active any more ?--OLPC - Sven AERTS (talk) 23:04, 29 March 2009 (UTC)

Does "Human development" refer only to biological development?[edit]

The article is heavy on biological aspects and takes a decidedly materialistic view, making a human being little more than an organism.

I think this quote provides additional perspectives that can lead us to explore additional aspects of human development in the article:

We can conceive of human development in a variety of ways. In political-economic terms, human development has to do with stability, security and relative prosperity. In social terms, it has to do with literacy, education, social relationships, quality of life, etc. In moral terms, it has to do with the development of the conscience, moral awareness, and the will and capacity to act according to our knowledge of what is right. In psychological terms, human development has to do with mental health, self-esteem, success in significant relationships, happiness. [1] --Uncle Ed 14:14, 18 October 2005 (UTC)
Nice quote. There is certainly more to human development than just biology. However it may be that each of these topics (social development, moral development, etc) are best handled in their own articles. -Willmcw 19:22, 18 October 2005 (UTC)
I agree. The article's even called "Human Development (Biology)". --Partymetroid 06:34, 16 September 2007 (UTC)

Suggested merge[edit]

where do we discuss the suggested merging?+Human development is a disambig pg

i see no specific section marked out for the suggested merging discussion...so i'll just comment here. (if there is a specific place to discuss this, pls tell me...thanks.)

i clicked on the link to Human development...and it is a disambig pg, on which Human development (biology) is listed. can somebody pls clarify this? thnx. i'm just v confused... 202.156.6.54 13:24, 17 July 2006 (UTC)

It seems to me that anyone who would propose or support a suggested merge of Human development (biology) into Human development is not aware that Human development is also a psychological field by the same name. Biological human development simply cannot have the name all to itself. I just Googled "Department of human development" which found 180,000 pages, and ALL of the top ten pages refer to the psychological study of human development. There needs to be more than simply a redirect of Human development (psychology) to Developmental psychology. -DoctorW 17:37, 29 July 2006 (UTC)
The person who placed the proposed merge tag in June never commented! (Neither has anyone else.) I'm going to remove the tag. I believe that the existence of a disambiguation page in this case is non-negotiable anyway (see my comments immediately above). The psychological study of "human development" (known by that name as well as by the name "developmental psychology") cannot be ignored. Academic departments named "Human Development" refer to the psychological study. It has its own identity, and a very significant presence. Wikipedia has no choice but to acknowledge it. -DoctorW 03:58, 1 September 2006 (UTC)

Holistic Human Development?[edit]

I removed this paragraph from the article:

We can conceive of human development in a variety of ways. In political-economic terms, human development has to do with stability, security and relative prosperity. In social terms, it has to do with literacy, education, social relationships, quality of life, etc. In moral terms, it has to do with the development of the conscience, moral awareness, and the will and capacity to act according to our knowledge of what is right. In psychological terms, human development has to do with mental health, self-esteem, success in significant relationships, happiness [no punctuation or clear end of sentence]

...Otherwise the article is entirely about biological development. Perhaps some one would like to make it more coherent, more academically sound, and expand it into an article. On the other hand, it deals with such gigantic, sweeping generalities that it may be too unwieldy to make into a good quality article. -DoctorW 04:29, 1 September 2006 (UTC)

Template:Humandevelopment[edit]

Please see Template talk:Humandevelopment. -DoctorW 19:03, 27 October 2006 (UTC)

Embryo[edit]

... Why doesn't this article include the embryo process? --Partymetroid 06:34, 16 September 2007 (UTC)

Oh, okay. There's already an article called "Human embryogenesis". Whoops. I guess it would be cryptic calling it "Post-birth Human Biological Development". ^_^; —Preceding unsigned comment added by Partymetroid (talkcontribs) 06:35, 16 September 2007 (UTC)

Okay, needs some cleanup[edit]

These are the life stages I've been tought to know

  • Childhood(A Child is one who has not yet reached or is still going through puberty)
    • Infancy(Baby/Neotate/New Born: One who is newly born)
    • Toddlerhood(One who is learning ABC's, talking, walking, etc.)
    • Middle Childhood(Elemtry age/Primary education: one is knows there ABC's, etc. put is not mature enough for responsibility)
    • Preteenhood(Tween/Middle School age: One who is old enough for responsibility)
    • Adolescence(Teenhood/Late Childhood: One who is going through puberty)
  • Adulthood(One who is done with puberty)
    • Young Adult(One who is done with puberty but still has some growing up to do)
    • Middle age(One who is done growing up but is still able to produce offspring)
    • Old age(Senior Citizen/Advanced Adult: One who is too old to produce offspring)

The Average age for these would be

If anyone here agrees or disagrees, tell me --Mr. Comedian 16:31, 17 October 2007 (UTC)

  • I think that they should just take all of this down because this isnt telling all about this human body cycle. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 99.8.35.216 (talk) 22:18, 14 October 2008 (UTC)
It seems people consider death/decomposition a step. I don't see the trouble in adding things as long as they don't interfere with the integrity of existing stages. One thing that does do this which may be a legitimate point is the division and distinction between 'neonate/newborn' and 'infant/baby'. The main problem is even if we make this on this page, all 4 terms just direct to the infancy article. I've brought this up on that talk page. DB (talk) 22:38, 18 April 2011 (UTC)

After decomposition[edit]

Is this really the last step? I think we should list when what we decompose into is eaten. I mean yeah, bacterial digestion is a decomposing process but clearly there's forms of consumption which we might not call that since everything is broken down. Something like 'reincorporation' perhaps? Like when the elements we decompose into are incorporated into other things like plants or other animals? DB (talk) 22:36, 18 April 2011 (UTC)

Adult hands holding the foot of a baby[edit]

Is it just me, or does this image look like a severed foot? Perhaps there is a less freaky image that could replace this image. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.163.58.23 (talk) 07:01, 4 February 2013 (UTC)

Nope, not just you. The imagery is a bit freaky-looking. Flyer22 (talk) 07:04, 4 February 2013 (UTC)
Note: An IP removed the image moments ago. Flyer22 (talk) 05:54, 26 May 2013 (UTC)

Removed Problematic Quote[edit]

Here's the quote:

"From a biological standpoint, human development is a continuum, starting with the germ cells (ovum and spermatozoon), through fertilization, prenatal development, and growth through adulthood. The germinal stage, refers to ovum (egg) prior to fertilization, through the development of the early embryo, up until the time of implantation.[1]" Reference: Gilbert, Scott F. (2003). "Prenatal Development". Human Development (9th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw Hill College. ISBN 978-0072820300"

PROBLEMS:

  • From a biological standpoint, human development is a continuum, starting with the germ cells (ovum and spermatozoon), through fertilization, prenatal development, and growth through adulthood. - Numerous uses of this sentence were found, but all referred back to this article. I found an almost identical statement, but with very different meaning, which I believe is likely the source: "Human development: 1) Human development is the process of growing to maturity. In biological terms this entails growth from a one celled zygote to an adult human being. 2) Biological development 3) From a philosophical perspective human development is a continuum, starting with the germ cells (ovum and spermatozoon), through fertilization, prenatal development, birth, and growth to adulthood." from Study Guide for: Anthropology and Contemporary Human Problems by John H. Bodley, ISBN 9780759121584
  • The germinal stage, refers to ovum (egg) prior to fertilization, through the development of the early embryo, up until the time of implantation. - Fertilization occurs when the sperm successfully enters the ovum's membrane. The genetic material of the sperm and egg then combine to form a single cell called a zygote and the germinal stage of prenatal development commences.
  • Reference: Gilbert, Scott F. (2003). "Prenatal Development". Human Development (9th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw Hill College. ISBN 978-0072820300. - This reference doesn't exist. The ISBN # refers to: Human development by Diane E Papalia; Sally Wendkos Olds; Ruth Duskin Feldman. There's no chapter called Prenatal Development and Scott Gilbert isn't a contributor. There is a book: Developmental Biology, by Scott F. Gilbert & Susan Singer. The ISBN is 978-0878932504. It doesn't contain either of the two above quotes (ie, "From a biological standpoint..." or "The germinal stage refers to ovum...")OckRaz talk 09:12, 6 October 2013 (UTC)
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Good job! Lova Falk talk 13:49, 19 October 2013 (UTC)

Erroneous Redirect[edit]

There is a redirect from School age to here. This page however is about biology and school age is a statutorily defined age not a biologically defined one.

For want of another way of flagging this up I've commented on Talk:School_age and proposed the redirect be ammended to point to Compulsory_education#Variation_in_countries. This ref is a bit thin but in the absence of anything better it will at least be correct.

Can anyone help achieve this?

LookingGlass (talk) 13:01, 6 June 2014 (UTC)