Talk:Hurro-Urartian languages

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Section[edit]

Is the relation between Hurrian and Urartian beyond question, or is it still disputed? What are the resemblances? (We REALLY need some substantial info about the languages in the respective articles; all it is said is that they are "agglutinative".)
Jorge Stolfi 04:55, 19 Apr 2004 (UTC)

I don't know where you are getting your info from Jeorge, have a look at this paper http://www.humnet.ucla.edu/pies/pdfs/IESV/1/VVI_Horse.pdf Zestauferov 15:17, 29 Apr 2004 (UTC)

German version[edit]

Could someone translate the much more informative German version of the article?
(My German isn't so good to do that myself) Omnipedian (talk) 06:31, 29 August 2008 (UTC)

Category: Pre Indo-Europeans?[edit]

These languages were spoken in areas where later - and to some extent today - Indo-European languages are spoken. By definition, in these areas, they are pre Indo-European. I propose to re-categorize this page under Category: Pre Indo-Europeans. Richard Keatinge (talk) 10:15, 21 October 2009 (UTC)

On the area where were spoken Hurro Urartian languages now live also people speaking Semite and Ural-Altaic languages than we put some Pre-Semit and Pre-Ural altaic language? Nakh 04:27, 22 October 2009 (UTC)

That seems quite reasonable, yes. Richard Keatinge (talk) 06:06, 22 October 2009 (UTC)

is the area in question historically Ural Altic/Semitic or Indo-European? I think you need to brush up on Caucasian history and Brush your teeth, I can smell your bullshit from here Nakh. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.17.71.176 (talk) 08:03, 26 November 2010 (UTC)

Britannica article 2007-2010[edit]

The Hurrians enter the orbit of ancient Middle Eastern civilization toward the end of the 3rd millennium BC. They arrived in Mesopotamia from the north or the east, but it is not known how long they had lived in the peripheral regions. There is a brief inscription in Hurrian language from the end of the period of Akkad, while that of King Arishen (or Atalshen) of Urkish and Nawar is written in Akkadian. The language of the Hurrians must have belonged to a widespread group of ancient Middle Eastern languages. The relationship between Hurrian and Subarean has already been mentioned, and the language of the Urartians, who played an important role from the end of the 2nd millennium to the 8th century BC, is likewise closely related to Hurrian. According to the Soviet scholars Igor M. Diakonov and Sergei A. Starostin, the Eastern Caucasian languages are an offshoot of the Hurrian-Urartian group. Encyclopaedia Britannica.History of Mesopotamia. The Hurrians.The British Encyclopedia rather conservative edition, but here is absolutely precise and is clearly told in what language spoke Huurrites.According to S.A.Starostin the term Hurrites - "Hurri" means "people of the East".Besides there are incontestable proofs in favour of that prophet Avraam was Hurrian. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 81.24.80.50 (talk) 19:37, 13 August 2010 (UTC)

Removed reference to Urartian still existing[edit]

I've removed a statement inserted by anonymous User: 66.100.86.10, which stated that Urartian is not extinct and is still spoken by 35 people in modern Turkey. The only reference for this was this news article by a site called Hurriyet WEBTV. It's in Turkish so I can't understand the video, but I used Google Translate to see what the text says and it does seem to mention "Urartian", though I would be highly doubtful of this. Since this is not a reliable source, and can't even be understood by most users here I've removed the reference. It shouldn't be put back unless some more reliable source makes the claim that this ancient language is still alive. --Hibernian (talk) 04:04, 11 October 2012 (UTC)

Removed self-published original research[edit]

An amateur linguist whose name is Arnaud Fournet has a self-published (i.e. not peer-reviewed) e-journal "The Macro Comparative Journal" where he posts his own research. I removed references to his material as WP:NOR. Talskubilos (talk) 13:22, 30 October 2012 (UTC)

You should have posted this to Talk:Kassite language, too. I was puzzled why you had deleted the info together with the ref as OR and restored it. I have since found a good source, and you can actually review the evidence here, p. 17. The evidence is open to doubt in view of its scantness, and its interpretation is a further matter, but the similarities are at least remarkable and the possibility that Kassite was affiliated to Hurro-Urartian is considerable enough to deserve mention. --Florian Blaschke (talk) 20:18, 28 June 2013 (UTC)

OK, the problem is others editors have been fooled by Fournet's trick, as in Kassite_deities. Talskubilos (talk) 11:59, 17 July 2013 (UTC)