Talk:Hydraulic head

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Merge Hydraulic head (hydrology) to Hydraulic head[edit]

How is this disambiguation? Hydraulic clearly implies water, and head clearly implies pressure. Furthermore I don't see why they are different in "slow-flowing groundwater" or the presumably faster "fluid dynamic oriented definitions". Could I suggest simply moving the Hydraulic head (hydrology) here? --Mwtoews 23:14, 8 August 2006 (UTC)

Due to no interest, I'll merge Head (hydraulic) and Hydraulic head (hydrology) into one Hydraulic head article. Due to my time, this will not be now. +mwtoews 01:31, 30 August 2006 (UTC)

I am the one that initially set up the two different pages, and I suppose it would be fine to merge them, but you should make it clear that there are two different common definitions for the same thing, which involve different assumptions. --kris 03:13, 30 August 2006 (UTC)
I'll try my best to do that (when ever I get the chance). In the end, they are both a measure of fluid potential energy, applied slightly differently (unless I'm mistaken?).+mwtoews 18:09, 30 August 2006 (UTC)
I'm in the middle of rewriting Hydraulic head (hydrology) into this article. It should be complete in the next day or so. +mwtoews 02:41, 27 September 2006 (UTC)
Done merge from Hydraulic head (hydrology) to this article. Review, and modify my additions/changes, if needed. I'm not sure how (or if) Head (hydraulic) should be merged here, but I'll keep that tag up there for any takers. +mwtoews 18:12, 27 September 2006 (UTC)

Proposal to merge Head (hydraulic) to Hydraulic head[edit]

Just starting the discussion. Please note the relevant context above. --Iamunknown 04:23, 7 October 2006 (UTC)

I agree with merging both topics. Hydraulic head and Head (hydraulic) should be the same content and the current content on each article aplies to both entries. There should be no distintion among them.--RFMarves 05:36, 11 October 2006 (UTC)

The real question is if "hydulic head" or "head" are different, and I'm not sure if they are the same in the engineering world. I'm not an engineer, so I can't say for sure. To confuse matters, my fluvial hydrology notes indicate that "hydraulic head" is the same as "total head". +mwtoews 05:28, 12 October 2006 (UTC)

Terminology is confused[edit]

Hydraulic head here is defined as what is commonly denoted as total head or energy head, see e.g. Chanson (2004), "Hydraulics of Open Channel Flow", p. 22. There, hydraulic head is defined as z + p/(ρg). References outside groundwater flow are anyway lacking in this article. -- Crowsnest (talk)

Reconciliation[edit]

I have completed a review of the following articles to reconcile them... their equations (to some degree), and their definitions regarding heads and their components. It's a touchy subject because of all of the hydrologists who use equations without regard to their more general use, especially in systems like pipes and pumps.

In short, there are three heads in the Bernoulli equation. Friction is another animal, and so would be certain types of turbulence, phase changes, temperature changes, viscosity, etc. But this should cover most bases. I like to saw logs! (talk) 07:09, 5 December 2008 (UTC)

re reqphoto[edit]

this any use ?

Hydraulic head.PNG

— Preceding unsigned comment added by Traveler100 (talkcontribs) 08:31, 8 August 2009‎ (UTC)

Sure. I added it to the article. -- Crowsnest (talk) 20:21, 2 October 2012 (UTC)