Talk:Hydrothermal circulation

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The chimney link points to brick chimneys. It needs to be changed to a better place but I don't know what the correct term for these underwater chimneys are. Theresa knott 20:58, 2 Aug 2003 (UTC)


Added link to black smoker, the current term for these features.--Vsmith 02:23, 20 Sep 2004 (UTC)

Seems this needs to be made more general considering what links here and the hydrothermal redirect. Probably should be merged with hydrothermal vent ...
Maybe I'll do it sometime ... --Vsmith 02:34, 20 Sep 2004 (UTC)

Cut the following which was added by an anon in May:

Global budgets of dissolved ions can be greatly affected, by the cycling of water through these vent systems. Depending on the ion in question cycling through a vent can either remove or add ions to the water that's eventually expelled back into the ocean bottom. Most Noteably sulfate is removed via combination with Calcium ions to produce anhydrite as well as being reduced into hydrogen sulfide. Magnesium, too, is lost by formaing magnesium hydroxide silicates. Some sodium may be lost by cation exchange when it replaces Calcium in plagioclase feldspars (also method by which Calcium is released to form anhydrite precipitate). Iron, Silica and Manganese are often added to the water that is eventually expelled. pH significantly declines to the point that almost all alkalinity within the beginning water is lost. (German and Von Damm. 2003. Hydrothermal Processes. Treatise on Geochemistry. 6.07.)

Seems it needs some rewording. The ref I presume to be The Oceans and Marine Geochemistry : Treatise on Geochemistry, Volume 6, May 2006, ISBN 0080451012 Vsmith 16:05, 8 June 2006 (UTC)