Talk:Hydroxyl radical

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comment[edit]

I don't know how to edit the side bar on these pages, but the units on molar entropy are wrong. Numerically the value matches literature, but it should be J/K*mol not kJ/K*mol — Preceding unsigned comment added by 128.138.65.169 (talk) 01:25, 19 April 2013 (UTC)

"In organic synthesis hydroxyl radicals are most commonly generated by photolysis of 1-Hydroxy-2(1H)-pyridinethione."

Is there a way to mass produce these radicals? Theoretical or not?

Is there any source for the half life of 10^-9 seconds?

What about HOH?[edit]

I'm not a chemist, so I am not going to mess with this article, but there should be just a wee mention of that rather common compound HOH, known also by it's vulgar name "water". It could be regarded a degenerate alcohol (just put a 0 in the alkyl formula). There are mentions of H2O deep in the article, but this being HOH is just implied, never stated.  Randall Bart   Talk  23:50, 30 December 2008 (UTC)

.

Hydroxyl decrease?[edit]

Didn't the IPCC predict a 20% drop in atmospheric hydroxyl in 2001? and NASA noticed a drop in the 1980's? --86.164.206.191 (talk) 02:20, 22 November 2009 (UTC)

Request Clarification[edit]

"...which can enhance corrosion and SCC in coolant systems..."

Meaning it enhances such systems' resistance to corrosion and SCC or it enhances the process of corrosion and SCC? I would think the former is obviously preferable, but the phrasing could be clearer.

OH- and HO-[edit]

Actually the most correct form is HO-,that has been stated by IUPAC. Please someone take the time to correct it and find suitable references. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 193.136.24.66 (talk) 18:58, 28 January 2010 (UTC)

We do not need to ref it. The H has formed its duplet and has no electron for another Covalent bond, but the oxygen has AddyC (talk) 17:49, 5 June 2011 (UTC)
So the notation •HO used in the article is incorrect?
Which one should we use instead: "HO•" "HO-" "-OH" "•OH"?
More generally, are dot and dash equivalent for IUPAC? Or is "-" used for functional groups (bound to something else), "•" for unsatisfied valences (in "free radicals")?
I have been told that IUPAC allows the use of "radical" only if the unattached group is in certain spin states. Is that so? --Jorge Stolfi (talk) 16:48, 29 January 2013 (UTC)
"-" and "•" are definitely not equivalent. The former indicates a functional group when set regular and a negative charge when in superscript. The latter indicates an unpaired electron, which is the case for the hydroxyl radical, as the name says. [1] suggests to put the dot next to "the atom with the highest spin density". AFAIK, the everyday use in atmospheric chemistry goes for just "OH", made more correct by conversion to "•OH". However, [2] on page 1373 spells it out "HO•". Nowhere have I ever seen the here used "HO", which is in my opinion not only wrong because of the superscript but also the indicated location of the unpaired electron. This should definitely be fixed! Florian.rubach (talk) 13:35, 13 August 2013 (UTC)

If "s" in "approx. 10−9 s" means "seconds" the article should say "seconds"[edit]

If "s" in "approx. 10−9 s" means "seconds" the article should say "seconds." — Preceding unsigned comment added by Ocdnctx (talkcontribs) 01:30, 20 April 2011 (UTC)

s is a standard and internationally accepted abbreviation for seconds in science.96.54.32.44 (talk) 17:14, 6 July 2011 (UTC)

H3+ or H3O+[edit]

In the section on Chemistry of the molecule OH, subsection OH destruction pathways

"so the abundance of •OH depends mainly on the H3+ abundance."
There's no mention of H3+ in any of the production or destruction equations, but H3O+ does appear in the production equations. Is this a typo for H3O+, or how is H3+ actually involved in the chemistry? 96.54.32.44 (talk) 17:26, 6 July 2011 (UTC)