Talk:Hypervitaminosis A

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WikiProject Medicine / Dermatology / Toxicology (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
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This article is supported by the Dermatology task force.
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This article is supported by the Toxicology task force (marked as Mid-importance).
 

Article categorization[edit]

This article was initially categorized based on scheme outlined at WP:DERM:CAT. kilbad (talk) 23:19, 20 February 2009 (UTC)

Comment[edit]

The article states that "Toxicity has been shown to be mitigated through vitamin E, Cholesterol, Zinc, Taurine and Calcium." This seems questionable, especially since it includes taurine, so I added a citation needed tag. Does anyone have a source for this? Ψαμαθος 08:25, 12 August 2008 (UTC)

Small amounts of liver?[edit]

According to the source cited, 3.5 ounces (99 g) of walrus liver contains 81200 IU of vitamin A, 1624% the USRDA. Wouldn't it be non-toxic (and in fact a good way to get vitamin A for people like Arctic explorers who may have difficulty finding beta-carotene-rich veggies) to eat only 0.2 ounces (5.7 g) of walrus liver, yielding only 5800 IU (93% USRDA) of vitamin A? Obviously that's not enough for a meal, but as a little supplement to a meal. +Angr 12:36, 25 March 2010 (UTC)