Talk:Hypnerotomachia Poliphili

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common symbolism?[edit]

I read that there was some common symbolism with Phileas Fogg from Around the World in Eighty Days. Something about the esoteric (Masonic?) leanings of Jules Verne. Confirmation? -- Error

I have never heard of this; it is certainly not impossible. I would have thought Verne to have been more of a rationalist, but he does use such devices as Runic cyphers and similarly esoteric themes. -- IHCOYC 03:43, 30 Jul 2003 (UTC)
Oh no. There are some more symbolism. Robur the Conqueror (R.C.) and Rosicrucians. Something about Clovis Dardentor and L'ardent or de Clovis (old treasure at Rennes le Chateau). He seemed to like esoteric references. -- Error 04:06, 30 Jul 2003 (UTC)

Added section[edit]

Added section on the the Hypnerotomachia in other fiction. I've started with John Crowley's Love and Sleep -- there's no conspiracy about the connection there -- User:jhbadger

parallels[edit]

Has anyone noticed any parallels between the Hypnerotomachia and the apocryphal Book of Enoch? Something about the way the text describes poliphilo's meanderings and observations reminds me of it somewhat. I haven't read very much of the Hypnerotomachia yet but it was something that struck me initially. Something about the mysterious place that he wanders to also gives me the notion that he has somehow discovered the lost continent of Atlantis. I thought maybe others have had this feeling too or perhaps had read the Book of Enoch and had noticed any parallels.

Alberto Pérez-Gómez wrote a 1992 contemporary retelling of the Hypnerotomachia that he entitled "Polyphilo or The Dark Forest Revisited - An Erotic Epiphany of Architecture" - a reference to MIT press webpage: http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=8942 the book is currently shown as out of print. M9 00:17, 30 December 2005 (UTC)

takes place at Princeton[edit]

The Rule of Four takes place at Princeton, not Yale. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 152.10.163.30 (talkcontribs)

That was vandalism edit made a day before your comment. Check the edit history if you see anything suspicious or utterly ridiculous next time - most likely it's an unspotted vandalism edit. Aran|heru|nar 09:02, 6 September 2006 (UTC)

suggestion on point 5.5[edit]

I wanted to make a suggestion on point 5.5: Gypnerotomahiya (animation) Occasionally in Russian, the G letter Г is actually pronouced as a H, thus making this Hypnerotomahiya - as is also shown on the link provided: [1] (And it's, of course, in keeping with the original title.) Thanks. --khrystene (talk) 16:34, 3 January 2009 (UTC)

New edit for plot summary[edit]

After seeing a dead wikipedia link and considering the overall synopsis, I edited one of the words to be "erotomania" as opposed to "erotomachia". Cassius235 (talk) 15:03, 14 July 2014 (UTC)