Talk:Hypovolemia

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Untitled[edit]

even the possibility of internal bleeding in children should always be treated aggressively.

We're making normative statements now? -- 66.32.101.117 23:47, 26 Jan 2005 (UTC)

I've seen this referred to as 'hypohemia', with 12,000 google matches to back this up (though meager compared to hypovolemia's 435,000). Perhaps I should create a redirect to this page under that name. Any thoughts? -Etafly 06:22, 21 March 2007 (UTC)

I find this article difficult to read because it has too much medical jargon which I would argue is unneeded. Added cleanup-jargon template to the top of the page. --Epochwolf (talk) 03:22, 1 June 2009 (UTC)


I have removed the sentence " When in doubt, treat hypovolemia aggressively" as there is a wealth of research saying that aggressive treatment of hypovolemia aimed at restoring pre-insult blood pressures can be very damaging[1]. Permissive Hypotension is generally advised. I do agree that blood loos should pobviously be aggressively managed but this sentence was unclear. Tannim101 (talk) 22:01, 27 April 2010 (UTC)

The Diagnosis section is written too much like an instruction manual. I don't think the average reader will be tempted to treat the illness if they see the symptoms; I would hope they'd call for more professional help. Mavrisa (talk) 21:17, 29 June 2010 (UTC)

Under history, the article says "The word was possibly used to describe the lack of personality (by death or by weakness) that often occurred once a person suffered hemorrhage or massive blood loss." The sentence seems to be nonsense. What is meant by "lack of personality"? Do people become boring once they have suffered hemorrhage or massive blood loss? If the term "personality" refers to some medical term, the term should either link to a wikipedia page on the subject. If no article exists which would explain this sentence, it should be rephrased. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.92.211.22 (talk) 05:54, 2 September 2011 (UTC)

Well I don't think whoever said "Lack of Personality" meant what is implied, I believe they may have worded it wrong to say. I think what they meant is that it can cause delirium or alteration in personality, of course it can also cause unconsciousness and who has a personality when they are unconscious really?? I think they should remove this from the category Start class Medicine articles if it cannot be explained better in Laymen terms, and try to put a redirect to an understanding page explaining what plasma is, etc. As far as dehydration goes in layman's terms what this is is a lack of the liquid part of the blood (plasma) due to lack of water in the body due to dehydration, and then use the references, and link to the Complex explanation of this.. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 108.236.94.2 (talk) 08:46, 23 May 2013 (UTC)

I came to the talk pages to discuss this very sentence: "The word was possibly used to describe the lack of personality (by death or by weakness) that often occurred once a person suffered hemorrhage or massive blood loss." I think it should be deleted, since it makes absolutely no sense and has no reference whatsoever. The word is a textbook latin derivative - "ex- outwards/out" "sanguineus - blood," which is explained in the first sentence of the section. It has nothing to do with personality. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 66.168.145.178 (talk) 04:47, 6 July 2014 (UTC)

  1. ^ http://www.trauma.org/archive/resus/permissivehypotension.html